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Diseguaglianza, conflitto sociale e sindacati in America


  • Antonio Lettieri

    () (CISS, Centri Internazionale Studi Sociali)


A comparison of the 2007-08 crisis with that of 1929 showed its extreme gravity, but it also may have implied that the old harmful mistakes would not be repeated. After four years, the crisis has not been solved and it even threatens to worsen. Neo-conservative Republicans claim that this is proof of the failure of Keynesian policies. Yet, there is something structurally distorted in the institutions and policies of American industrial relations. The fall of the ‘social contract’ is the basic element of the crisis of the American social and economic model. In comparison with the crisis of the Thirties and its aftermath, what initially was supposed to possibly evolve toward a new New Deal of the Twenty-first century has evolved just in its opposite.

Suggested Citation

  • Antonio Lettieri, 2012. "Diseguaglianza, conflitto sociale e sindacati in America," Moneta e Credito, Economia civile, vol. 65(258), pages 115-144.
  • Handle: RePEc:psl:moneta:2012:23

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Cynamon Barry Z. & Fazzari Steven M., 2008. "Household Debt in the Consumer Age: Source of Growth--Risk of Collapse," Capitalism and Society, De Gruyter, vol. 3(2), pages 1-32, October.
    2. Kazimierz Laski & Roman Römisch, 2001. "Growth and Savings in USA and Japan," wiiw Working Papers 16, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    3. Julio Lopez & Tracy Mott, 1999. "Kalecki Versus Keynes on the Determinants of Investment," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 291-301.
    4. Fitoussi Jean Paul & Saraceno Francesco, 2010. "Europe: How Deep Is a Crisis? Policy Responses and Structural Factors Behind Diverging Performances," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 1-19, January.
    5. Aldo Barba & Massimo Pivetti, 2009. "Rising household debt: Its causes and macroeconomic implications--a long-period analysis," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(1), pages 113-137, January.
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    More about this item


    Inequality; globalization; labour; welfare; trade unions;

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian
    • B50 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - General


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