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Determinants of breastfeeding practices in Myanmar: Results from the latest nationally representative survey

Author

Listed:
  • Yadanar
  • Kyaw Swa Mya
  • Nopphol Witvorapong

Abstract

Optimal breastfeeding practices can ensure healthy growth and development of infants, which in the long term can impact the country's economic development. Nevertheless, Myanmar has yet to achieve the WHO’s target of 70% for early initiation of breastfeeding, and the country’s target of 90% for exclusive breastfeeding. The purpose of this study was to assess the associations between early initiation of breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding and bio-demographic, socio-economic and behavioral factors in Myanmar. Using the 2015–2016 Myanmar Demographic and Health Survey, the analysis of early initiation of breastfeeding was based on a sample of 1,506 under-2 children and the analysis of exclusive breastfeeding was based on a sample of 376 children aged 0–5 months. Multiple logistic modeling, with heteroskedasticity-adjusted standard errors, was used. The prevalence rates of early initiation of breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding in the study were 67.9% and 52.2% respectively. Having a vaginal delivery (AOR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.7–3.7) and having frequent (≥ 4) antenatal visits (AOR = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.5–3.8) were associated with higher odds of early initiation of breastfeeding. Having a postnatal checkup (AOR = 0.5; 95% CI = 0.3–0.9) and having an infant that was perceived to be small at birth (AOR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.1–5.7, for infants perceived to be large at birth) were significantly associated with decreased odds of exclusive breastfeeding. In order to promote optimal breastfeeding practices, this study suggested that delivery and quality of health services during pregnancy need to be strengthened in Myanmar.

Suggested Citation

  • Yadanar & Kyaw Swa Mya & Nopphol Witvorapong, 2020. "Determinants of breastfeeding practices in Myanmar: Results from the latest nationally representative survey," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(9), pages 1-14, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:plo:pone00:0239515
    DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0239515
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Emily R Smith & Lisa Hurt & Ranadip Chowdhury & Bireshwar Sinha & Wafaie Fawzi & Karen M Edmond & on behalf of the Neovita Study Group, 2017. "Delayed breastfeeding initiation and infant survival: A systematic review and meta-analysis," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 12(7), pages 1-16, July.
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