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Entry Discrimination in the NHL: Evolution and the KHL Effect

Author

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  • Tom Christie

    (Department of Economics, University of Ottawa, 120 University street, Ottawa, Ontario,K1N 6N5, Canada. E-mails: mlavoie@uottawa.ca; tachristie@gmail.com)

  • Marc Lavoie

    (Department of Economics, University of Ottawa, 120 University street, Ottawa, Ontario,K1N 6N5, Canada. E-mails: mlavoie@uottawa.ca; tachristie@gmail.com)

Abstract

This paper revisits the issue of hiring discrimination in the National Hockey League (NHL), at the time of the draft. It updates studies that were last made for the 1993–1994 season with data from 2009 to 2010. The results show that there is still no entry discrimination against American hockey players. Entry discrimination against French Canadian hockey players seems to have disappeared. There is still apparent entry discrimination against non-Russian European hockey players, but less so than before. There is a strong and obvious KHL effect against Russian hockey players, which discourages NHL teams from drafting young Russian players as early as they should.

Suggested Citation

  • Tom Christie & Marc Lavoie, 2015. "Entry Discrimination in the NHL: Evolution and the KHL Effect," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 41(2), pages 214-229, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:pal:easeco:v:41:y:2015:i:2:p:214-229
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    Cited by:

    1. Craig A. Depken II & Johnny Ducking & Peter A. Groothuis, 2015. "Career Duration in the NHL: Bias against Europeans?," Working Papers 15-09, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
    2. Craig A. Depken & Johnny Ducking & Peter A. Groothuis, 2017. "Career duration in the NHL: pushing and pulling on Europeans?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(59), pages 5923-5934, December.

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