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How to Organize Crime -super-1

Author

Listed:
  • Mariagiovanna Baccara
  • Heski Bar-Isaac

Abstract

In criminal organizations, diffusing information widely throughout the organization might lead to greater internal efficiency (in particular, since these organizations are self-sustaining, through enhancing trust). However, this may come at the cost of leaving the organization more vulnerable to external threats such as law enforcement. We consider the implications of this trade-off and characterize the optimal information structure, rationalizing both "hierarchical" structures and organization in cells. Then, we focus on the role of the external authority, characterize optimal detection strategies, and discuss the implications of different forms of enforcement on the internal structure of the organization and policy. Finally, we discuss a number of applications and extensions. Copyright 2008, Wiley-Blackwell.

Suggested Citation

  • Mariagiovanna Baccara & Heski Bar-Isaac, 2008. "How to Organize Crime -super-1," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 75(4), pages 1039-1067.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:restud:v:75:y:2008:i:4:p:1039-1067
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-937X.2008.00508.x
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. B. Hoyer, 2012. "Network Disruption and the Common Enemy Effect," Working Papers 12-06, Utrecht School of Economics.
    2. Sanjeev Goyal & Adrien Vigier, 2014. "Attack, Defence, and Contagion in Networks," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 81(4), pages 1518-1542.
    3. Giovanni Mastrobuoni, 2013. "The Value of Connections: Evidence from the Italian-American Mafia," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 335, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    4. Goyal, S., 2016. "Networks and Markets," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1652, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    5. Meier, Stephan & Pierce, Lamar & Vaccaro, Antonino & La Cara, Barbara, 2016. "Trust and in-group favoritism in a culture of crime," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 132(PA), pages 78-92.
    6. Sunghoon Hong & Myrna Wooders, 2010. "Strategic Network Interdiction," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 1010, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
    7. McBride, Michael & Hewitt, David, 2013. "The enemy you can’t see: An investigation of the disruption of dark networks," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 32-50.
    8. D’Hernoncourt, Johanna & Méon, Pierre-Guillaume, 2012. "The not so dark side of trust: Does trust increase the size of the shadow economy?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 97-121.
    9. Buccirossi, Paolo & Immordino, Giovanni & Spagnolo, Giancarlo, 2017. "Whistleblower Rewards, False Reports, and Corporate Fraud," SITE Working Paper Series 42, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm Institute of Transition Economics, revised 29 Aug 2017.
    10. Dziubiński, Marcin & Goyal, Sanjeev, 2013. "Network design and defence," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 30-43.
    11. Levine, Emma E. & Schweitzer, Maurice E., 2015. "Prosocial lies: When deception breeds trust," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 88-106.
    12. Acemoglu, Daron & Malekian, Azarakhsh & Ozdaglar, Asu, 2016. "Network security and contagion," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 166(C), pages 536-585.
    13. Bravard, Christophe & Charroin, Liza & Touati, Corinne, 2017. "Optimal design and defense of networks under link attacks," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 62-79.
    14. Christophe Bravard & Liza Charroin & Corinne Touati, 2017. "Optimal Design and Defense of Networks Under Link Attacks," Post-Print hal-01384998, HAL.
    15. Marcin Dziubinski & Sanjeev Goyal & Adrien Vigier, 2015. "Conflict and Networks," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1565, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    16. Mastrobuoni Giovanni & Patacchini Eleonora, 2012. "Organized Crime Networks: an Application of Network Analysis Techniques to the American Mafia," Review of Network Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 11(3), pages 1-43, September.
    17. Marcin Dziubinski & Sanjeev Goyal, 2014. "How to Defend a Network?," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1450, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    18. Mariagiovanna Baccara, 2007. "Outsourcing, information leakage, and consulting firms," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 38(1), pages 269-289, March.
    19. repec:bla:manchs:v:85:y:2017:i:5:p:541-576 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Luís Cabral, 2005. "Collusion Theory: Where to Go Next?," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 5(3), pages 199-206, December.
    21. Giovanni Mastrobuoni & Eleonora Patacchini, 2010. "Understanding Organized Crime Networks: Evidence Based on Federal Bureau of Narcotics Secret Files on American Mafia," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 152, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    22. Diego Cerdeiro & Marcin Dziubinski & Sanjeev Goyal, 2015. "Contagion Risk and Network Design," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1547, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    23. DeAngelo, Gregory, 2012. "Making space for crime: A spatial analysis of criminal competition," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 42-51.
    24. repec:eee:jeborg:v:141:y:2017:i:c:p:43-63 is not listed on IDEAS
    25. Mohamed Belhaj & Frédéric Deroïan, 2018. "Targeting the Key Player: An Incentive-Based Approach," Working Papers halshs-01699849, HAL.

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