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A Widening Gulf among Britain's Mothers

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  • Dex, Shirley
  • Joshi, Heather
  • Macran, Susan

Abstract

It had become the norm for mothers in post-war Britain to interrupt employment after child-bearing. The trend to increased female labour-force participation involves a shortening of this break, but continuous careers are becoming more common. Many of the growing disparities. The last two decades qualifications are now maintaining full-time employment in high-level occupations when they become mothers. They take advantage of maternity leave and pay for child care. They diverge from the majority of women taking part-time jobs after periods in the home. This leads to a polarization in women's employment histories and means an uneven spread of women's gains from equal opportunities legislation. Copyright 1996 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Dex, Shirley & Joshi, Heather & Macran, Susan, 1996. "A Widening Gulf among Britain's Mothers," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(1), pages 65-75, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:12:y:1996:i:1:p:65-75
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    Cited by:

    1. Cordula Zabel, 2007. "Eligibility for materniy leave and first birth timing in Great Britain," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2007-009, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Jacobs, Josephine C. & Van Houtven, Courtney H. & Laporte, Audrey & Coyte, Peter C., 2015. "Baby Boomer caregivers in the workforce: Do they fare better or worse than their predecessors?," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 6(C), pages 89-101.
    3. Audra J Bowlus & Louise Grogan, "undated". "Equilibrium Job Search and Gender Wage Differentials in the UK," Canadian International Labour Network Working Papers 48, McMaster University.
    4. Nakamura, Jiro & Ueda, Atsuko, 1999. "On the Determinants of Career Interruption by Childbirth among Married Women in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 73-89, March.

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