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One Remark on Spillover Effects and the Gains from Coordination


  • Oliva, Juan Carlos Martinez


There is a firmly rooted presumption among economists that the greater the interdependence, the larger the externalities generated by unilateral policy-making and therefore the greater the potential gains from coordination. The author demonstrates that despite its intuitively obvious connection with the gains from coordination, interdependence is not in itself sufficient to ensure that advantages will stem from a cooperative process. Indeed, it is shown that, even if interdependence is certainly necessary for coordination gains, the actual source of such gains is comparative policy advantage. Copyright 1991 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Oliva, Juan Carlos Martinez, 1991. "One Remark on Spillover Effects and the Gains from Coordination," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 43(1), pages 172-176, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:43:y:1991:i:1:p:172-76

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Buiter, Willem H, 1981. "The Superiority of Contingent Rules over Fixed Rules in Models with Rational Expectations," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 91(363), pages 647-670, September.
    2. David K. H. Begg, 1980. "Rational Expectations and the Non-neutrality of Systematic Monetary Policy," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(2), pages 293-303.
    3. Taylor, John B, 1980. "Aggregate Dynamics and Staggered Contracts," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(1), pages 1-23, February.
    4. Barro, Robert J, 1974. "Are Government Bonds Net Wealth?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(6), pages 1095-1117, Nov.-Dec..
    5. Stanley Fischer & Franco Modigliani, 1978. "Towards an understanding of the real effects and costs of inflation," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 114(4), pages 810-833, December.
    6. Aizenman, Joshua & Frenkel, Jacob A, 1985. "Optimal Wage Indexation, Foreign Exchange Intervention, and Monetary Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(3), pages 402-423, June.
    7. David Currie & Paul Levine, 1985. "Macroeconomic Policy Design in an Interdependent World," NBER Chapters,in: International Economic Policy Coordination, pages 228-273 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Carlo Carraro & Francesco Giavazzi, 1988. "Can International Policy Coordination Really Be Counterproductive?," NBER Working Papers 2669, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Dornbusch, Rudiger & Fischer, Stanley, 1980. "Exchange Rates and the Current Account," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(5), pages 960-971, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Mooslechner & Martin Schuerz, 1999. "International Macroeconomic Policy Coordination: Any Lessons for EMU? A Selective Survey of the Literature," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 26(3), pages 171-199, September.

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