IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/jecgeo/v4y2004i4p389-420.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Some alternative geo-economics for Europe's regions

Author

Listed:
  • Bernard Fingleton

Abstract

In recent years we have seen major advances in economic geography theory, but only limited empirical analysis. This paper focuses on a spatial econometric modelling approach, informed by recent theoretical advances, to simulate possible economic geographies of the European Union. In the paper I show that a policy-induced boost to demand in peripheral economies could increase manufacturing productivity growth rates and levels across all regions, including the EU core as a result of spillover effects across regions. On the other hand faster core growth also spills over to the periphery raising productivity growth and levels, but is associated with diminishing rather than increasing periphery employment levels and with increased inequality. The best strategy seems therefore to encourage higher periphery growth rates, but not so high that they are unsustainable and themselves the cause of increased regional inequality. Copyright 2004, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Bernard Fingleton, 2004. "Some alternative geo-economics for Europe's regions," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(4), pages 389-420, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jecgeo:v:4:y:2004:i:4:p:389-420
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/jnlecg/lbh021
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Olejnik Alicja, 2014. "An Empirical Study Of Productivity Growth In EU28 - Spatial Panel Analysis," Comparative Economic Research, De Gruyter Open, vol. 17(4), pages 187-202, December.
    2. Miguel Gómez-Antonio & Bernard Fingleton, 2012. "Regional productivity variation and the impact of public capital stock: an analysis with spatial interaction, with reference to Spain," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(28), pages 3665-3677, October.
    3. GUILLAIN, Rachel & DALL'ERBA, Sandy & LE GALLO, Julie, 2007. "Politiques de développement et croissance régionale en Europe : le rôle des rendements croissants et des dépendances spatiales," LEG - Document de travail - Economie 2007-02, LEG, Laboratoire d'Economie et de Gestion, CNRS, Université de Bourgogne.
    4. Partridge, Mark D. & Rickman, Dan S. & Ali, Kamar & Olfert, M. Rose, 2009. "Agglomeration spillovers and wage and housing cost gradients across the urban hierarchy," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(1), pages 126-140, June.
    5. Brakman, Steven & Garretsen, Harry & Schramm, Marc, 2006. "Putting new economic geography to the test: Free-ness of trade and agglomeration in the EU regions," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 613-635, September.
    6. J. Kim Swales & David Learmonth, 2005. "Policy Spillovers in a Regional Target-Setting Regime," ERSA conference papers ersa05p341, European Regional Science Association.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:jecgeo:v:4:y:2004:i:4:p:389-420. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://joeg.oxfordjournals.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.