IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/jconrs/doi10.1086-597160.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

In Search of Homo Economicus: Cognitive Noise and the Role of Emotion in Preference Consistency

Author

Listed:
  • Leonard Lee
  • On Amir
  • Dan Ariely

Abstract

Understanding the role of emotion in forming preferences is critical in helping firms choose effective marketing strategies and consumers make appropriate consumption decisions. In five experiments, participants made a set of binary product choices under conditions designed to induce different degrees of emotional decision processing. The results consistently indicate that greater reliance on emotional reactions during decision making is associated with greater preference consistency and less cognitive noise. Additionally, the results of a meta-analytical study based on data from all five experiments further show that products that elicit a stronger emotional response are more likely to yield consistent preferences.

Suggested Citation

  • Leonard Lee & On Amir & Dan Ariely, 2009. "In Search of Homo Economicus: Cognitive Noise and the Role of Emotion in Preference Consistency," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 36(2), pages 173-187.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jconrs:doi:10.1086/597160
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/597160
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/597160
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:jouret:v:91:y:2015:i:3:p:468-485 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:spr:custns:v:5:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s40547-017-0084-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Duffy, Sean & Naddeo, JJ & Owens, David & Smith, John, 2016. "Cognitive load and mixed strategies: On brains and minimax," MPRA Paper 89720, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. repec:eee:jouret:v:90:y:2014:i:4:p:567-586 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:eee:jouret:v:93:y:2017:i:1:p:29-42 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:eee:jobhdp:v:150:y:2019:i:c:p:101-111 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Duffy, Sean & Gussman, Steven & Smith, John, 2019. "Judgments of length in the economics laboratory: Are there brains in choice?," MPRA Paper 93126, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. repec:eee:joinma:v:27:y:2013:i:1:p:47-61 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Jeffrey V. Butler & Luigi Guiso & Tullio Jappelli, 2013. "Manipulating Reliance on Intuition Reduces Risk and Ambiguity Aversion," EIEF Working Papers Series 1301, Einaudi Institute for Economics and Finance (EIEF), revised Jan 2013.
    10. repec:eee:spomar:v:21:y:2018:i:5:p:533-548 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:eee:ijrema:v:34:y:2017:i:3:p:746-760 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. repec:spr:eujhec:v:19:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s10198-017-0885-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Van Kerckhove, Anneleen & Geuens, Maggie & Vermeir, Iris, 2012. "Intention superiority perspectives on preference-decision consistency," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 65(5), pages 692-700.
    14. Michalek, Gabriela & Meran, Georg & Schwarze, Reimund & Yildiz, Özgür, 2016. "Nudging as a new "soft" policy tool: An assessment of the definitional scope of nudges, practical implementation possibilities and their effectiveness," Economics Discussion Papers 2016-18, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    15. Della Giusta, Marina & Vukadinovic-Greetham, Danica & Jaworska, Sylvia, 2018. "Tweeting Economists: Antisocial in the socials?," MPRA Paper 89527, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. repec:oup:jconrs:v:44:y:2017:i:4:p:719-723. is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Pham, Michel Tuan & Faraji-Rad, Ali & Toubia, Olivier & Lee, Leonard, 2015. "Affect as an ordinal system of utility assessment," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 81-94.
    18. Tamara Dinev & Allen R. McConnell & H. Jeff Smith, 2015. "Research Commentary—Informing Privacy Research Through Information Systems, Psychology, and Behavioral Economics: Thinking Outside the “APCO” Box," Information Systems Research, INFORMS, vol. 26(4), pages 639-655, December.
    19. Nexhbi Veseli & Lisa Alili, 2014. "The Influence Of Package Design On Consumer’S Shopping Decision," Economy & Business Journal, International Scientific Publications, Bulgaria, vol. 8(1), pages 469-486.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:jconrs:doi:10.1086/597160. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Oxford University Press to update the entry or send us the correct email address. General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.