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Private Property Rights and Presumptive Policy Entitlements: Reconsidering the Premises of Rural Policy


  • Bromley, Daniel W
  • Hodge, Ian


Private property in land gives agricultural producers a presumptive claim to certain policies that may be more costly than necessary, and may not achieve their intended results. In this paper, an alternative specification of property rights in land is explored, and it is shown how this different structure opens up new options for governments to influence the visual and economic attributes of rural areas. Under existing property regimes, farmers must be induced with financial concessions to use land in socially desired ways. Under an alternative property rights specification, farmers would have to pay for the right to modify certain land-use practices. Copyright 1990 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Bromley, Daniel W & Hodge, Ian, 1990. "Private Property Rights and Presumptive Policy Entitlements: Reconsidering the Premises of Rural Policy," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 17(2), pages 197-214.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:erevae:v:17:y:1990:i:2:p:197-214

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Spreen, Thomas H., 2006. "Price Endogenous Mathematical Programming Models and Trade Analysis," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 38(02), August.
    2. Brunstad, Rolf Jens & Gaasland, Ivar & Vardal, Erling, 1995. "Agriculture as a provider of public goods: a case study for Norway," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 13(1), October.
    3. Rolf Jens Brunstad & Ivar Gaasland & Erling VĂ¥rdal, 1999. "Agricultural Production and the Optimal Level of Landscape Preservation (," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 75(4), pages 538-546.
    4. Jeffrey M. Peterson & Richard N. Boisvert & Harry de Gorter, 2002. "Environmental policies for a multifunctional agricultural sector in open economies," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 29(4), pages 423-443, December.
    5. Rigoberto A. Lopez & Farhed A. Shah & Marilyn A. Altobello, 1994. "Amenity Benefits and the Optimal Allocation of Land," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 70(1), pages 53-62.
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