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The Credit Channel of Monetary Policy Transmission: Evidence from Stock Returns


  • Warner, Elizabeth J
  • Georges, Christophre


This paper offers a novel test of the credit view of the monetary policy transmission mechanism using stock market returns. We identify Fed policy shocks using newspaper accounts and track daily stock prices immediately following the shocks. If the credit channel is important, then firms that are dependent on bank credit and internal funds should receive a relatively greater benefit (loss) from a Fed easing (tightening) than firms with access to nonbank credit at favorable terms. We identify ten policy shocks during the expansion of 1993-94 and the "credit crunch" period of the 1990-91 recession and find little evidence supportive of an operative credit channel. Copyright 2001 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Warner, Elizabeth J & Georges, Christophre, 2001. "The Credit Channel of Monetary Policy Transmission: Evidence from Stock Returns," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 39(1), pages 74-85, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:39:y:2001:i:1:p:74-85

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    Cited by:

    1. Basistha, Arabinda & Kurov, Alexander, 2008. "Macroeconomic cycles and the stock market's reaction to monetary policy," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(12), pages 2606-2616, December.
    2. Haitsma, Reinder & Unalmis, Deren & de Haan, Jakob, 2016. "The impact of the ECB's conventional and unconventional monetary policies on stock markets," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 101-116.
    3. den Haan, Wouter J. & Sumner, Steven W. & Yamashiro, Guy M., 2007. "Bank loan portfolios and the monetary transmission mechanism," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 904-924, April.
    4. McCredie, Bronwyn & Docherty, Paul & Easton, Steve & Uylangco, Katherine, 2016. "The channels of monetary policy triggered by central bank actions and statements in the Australian equity market," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 46-61.
    5. Burton A. Abrams & Margaret Z. Clarke & Russell F. Settle, 2003. "Do Banks Matter? A Credit View Model for Small Open Economies," Working Papers 03-13, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
    6. Miao Jia, 2016. "The Long-Run Effects of the Fed’s Monetary Policy on the Dynamics among Major Asset Classes," International Journal of Management and Economics, De Gruyter Open, vol. 51(1), pages 9-19, September.

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