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Teaching Tools: How Is Introductory Economics Taught in America?

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  • Siegfried, John J, et al

Abstract

The authors describe the faculty, students, teaching methods, and assessment instruments used in 180 introductory economics classes taught by 122 different instructors at fifty-three different colleges and universities. Despite variation in class size and types of institution, both introductory macroeconomics and introductory microeconomics are taught predominantly as lecture courses, with the largest part of students' course grades determined by performance on multiple-choice question tests. There seems to be little experimentation with alternative pedagogies or assessment techniques despite an increasing amount of attention to these issues in recent years. Coauthors are Phillip Saunders, Ethan Stinar, and Hao Zhang. Copyright 1996 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Siegfried, John J, et al, 1996. "Teaching Tools: How Is Introductory Economics Taught in America?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 34(1), pages 182-192, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:34:y:1996:i:1:p:182-92
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    Cited by:

    1. Ken Rebeck & Carlos Asarta, 2011. "Methods of Assessment in the College Economics Course," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 16 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Becker, William E. & Powers, John R., 2001. "Student performance, attrition, and class size given missing student data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 377-388, August.
    3. Coates, Dennis & Humphreys, Brad R. & Kane, John & Vachris, Michelle A., 2004. ""No significant distance" between face-to-face and online instruction: evidence from principles of economics," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 533-546, October.
    4. Mary Ellen Benedict & John Hoag, 2011. "Factors Influencing Performance in Economics: Graphs and Quantitative Usage," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 31 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. KimMarie McGoldrick, 2010. "Advancing the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Economics," Chapters,in: Teaching Innovations in Economics, chapter 3 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Ninos P. Malek & Joshua C. Hall & Collin Hodges, 2014. "A Review and Analysis of the Effectiveness of Alternative Teaching Methods on Student Learning in Economics," Working Papers 14-27, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.

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