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Labour Mobility and the Portability of Social Rights in the EU

Author

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  • Anna Cristina d'Addio
  • Maria Chiara Cavalleri

Abstract

Using data from the Standard Eurobarometer survey 75.1 of 2011, the paper tests whether portability of social security within Europe is a key determinant of intra-European Union (EU) mobility. It does so by estimating a multinomial logit model with propensity matching comparing those survey respondents that made the experience of social security transfer in the past (either difficult or easy) to those that never had such experience. Estimations were run separately for two clusters of country: the older EU-15 and the newer EU-12. The results suggest that an easy experience with the transfer of social security across countries may increase the propensity to move abroad for professional reasons. In contrast, difficulties are likely to negatively affect mobility incentives. The sign of the effect is stable across countries, but intensity varies depending on the group of countries considered belonging to the EU-15 or EU-12. (JEL codes: J61, J62, H55, C25)

Suggested Citation

  • Anna Cristina d'Addio & Maria Chiara Cavalleri, 2015. "Labour Mobility and the Portability of Social Rights in the EU," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 61(2), pages 346-376.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cesifo:v:61:y:2015:i:2:p:346-376.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/cesifo/ifu014
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alvaro Forteza, 2010. "The Portability of Pension Rights: General Principles and the Caribbean Case," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 28(2), pages 237-255, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jan Stráský, 2016. "Priorities for completing the European Union's Single Market," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1315, OECD Publishing.
    2. Adrien-Paul Lambillon, 2014. "Immigration Restrictions Since the 2007 Crisis," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 12(2), pages 55-56, 07.
    3. Christian Dustmann & Giovanni Facchini & Cora Signorotto, 2015. "Population, Migration, Ageing and Health: A Survey," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1518, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    4. Omar S. Arias & Carolina Sánchez-Páramo & María E. Dávalos & Indhira Santos & Erwin R. Tiongson & Carola Gruen & Natasha de Andrade Falcão & Gady Saiovici & Cesar A. Cancho, 2014. "Back to Work : Growing with Jobs in Europe and Central Asia," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 16570.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities

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