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The Global Economy--Myths and Realities: Review Article


  • Perraton, Jonathan


Hirst and Thompson's Globalization in Question is the key text questioning claims of economic globalisation. This review of its revised second edition examines its main claims: that contemporary levels of international integration fall short of the Gold Standard period; genuinely global companies remain exceptional; capital mobility is not shifting economic activity to developing countries wholesale; international economic activity is primarily regional rather than global; and that international economic activity is sanctioned by nation states and remains subject to their political power. This review argues that, while their evidence provides a useful corrective to extreme globalisation views, focusing on this view understates changes in the international economy. Copyright 2001 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Perraton, Jonathan, 2001. "The Global Economy--Myths and Realities: Review Article," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(5), pages 669-684, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:25:y:2001:i:5:p:669-84

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Donald MacKenzie, 2006. "An Engine, Not a Camera: How Financial Models Shape Markets," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262134608, January.
    2. David Colander, 2009. "The Making of a European Economist," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 13617.
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    4. J. M. Keynes, 1937. "The General Theory of Employment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(2), pages 209-223.
    5. Jan Kregel, 2009. "Why don't the bailouts work? Design of a new financial system versus a return to normalcy," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(4), pages 653-663, July.
    6. Krueger, Anne O, et al, 1991. "Report of the Commission on Graduate Education in Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 1035-1053, September.
    7. Hodgson, Geoffrey M & Rothman, Harry, 1999. "The Editors and Authors of Economics Journals: A Case of Institutional Oligopoly?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(453), pages 165-186, February.
    8. Mark Blaug, 1991. "The Historiography of Economics," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 632.
    9. Stigler, George J & Stigler, Stephen M & Friedland, Claire, 1995. "The Journals of Economics," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(2), pages 331-359, April.
    10. Samuelson, Paul A. & Patinkin, Don & Blaug, Mark, 1991. "On the Historiography of Economics: A Correspondence," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(02), pages 144-158, September.
    11. Bruno S. Frey & Reiner Eichenberger, 1993. "American and European Economics and Economists," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(4), pages 185-193, Fall.
    12. Ingham, Geoffrey, 2004. "The nature of money," economic sociology_the european electronic newsletter, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies, vol. 5(2), pages 18-28.
    13. Geoffrey Hodgson, 2005. "Knowledge at work: Some neoliberal anachronisms," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 63(4), pages 547-565.
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    Cited by:

    1. Elsner, Wolfram & Hocker, Gero & Schwardt, Henning, 2009. "Simplistic vs. Complex Organization: Markets, Hierarchies, and Networks in an 'Organizational Triangle'," MPRA Paper 14315, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Jonathan Perraton, 2011. "The Scope and Implications of Globalisation," Chapters,in: The Handbook of Globalisation, Second Edition, chapter 3 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Wolfram Elsner, 2005. "Real-World Economics Today:The New Complexity, Co-ordination and Policy," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 63(1), pages 19-53.

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