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Fiscal Crisis and Fiscal Reform in Developing Countries


  • Toye, John


In recent years, policy-makers in developing countries have responded to crisis of macroeconomic instability with two sets of measures: conventional stabilisation policies and policies of economic liberalisation. The fiscal implications of this double agenda are set out, following three lines of enquiry. First, how can policies be kept consistent, when some liberalisation measures have large adverse fiscal consequences? Second, can a fiscal deficit be reduced without damaging the provision of public services vital for growth and poverty alleviation? Finally, since lack of tax revenue is usually the binding constraint on government intervention, how can this most easily be relaxed? Copyright 2000 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Toye, John, 2000. "Fiscal Crisis and Fiscal Reform in Developing Countries," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(1), pages 21-44, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:24:y:2000:i:1:p:21-44

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Turnovsky, Stephen J. & Basher, Md.A., 2009. "Fiscal policy and the structure of production in a two-sector developing economy," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 205-216, March.
    2. Jawadi Fredj & Mallick Sushanta K. & Sousa Ricardo M., 2014. "Fiscal policy in the BRICs," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 18(2), pages 1-15, April.
    3. Bigsten , Arne & Levin, Jörgen, 2000. "Growth, Income Distribution, and Poverty: A Review," Working Papers in Economics 32, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    4. Claudio Agostini, 2013. "Una Reforma Eficiente y Equitativa del Impuesto al Ingreso en Chile," Working Papers wp_028, Adolfo Ibáñez University, School of Government.
    5. Richard M. Bird, 2008. "Tax Challenges Facing Developing Countries," Working Papers id:1618, eSocialSciences.
    6. Di John, Jonathan, 2006. "The Political Economy of Taxation and Tax Reform in Developing Countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 074, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Tilman Brück & Christine Binzel & Lars Handrich, 2007. "Evaluating Economic Reforms in Syria: Final Report for the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ)," DIW Berlin: Politikberatung kompakt, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, volume 35, number pbk35.
    8. Hassan Bougrine, 2012. "Fiscal austerity, the Great Recession and the rise of new dictatorships," Review of Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 1(0), pages 109-125.
    9. Alexander Cobham, "undated". "Capital Account Liberalisation and Poverty," QEH Working Papers qehwps70, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
    10. repec:jle:journl:165 is not listed on IDEAS

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