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Food Values


  • Jayson L. Lusk
  • Brian C. Briggeman


Because of the potential malleability of stated and revealed preferences for new food technologies and attributes, this research sought to determine consumers' food value systems by utilizing recent advances in best-worst scaling. Based on previous literature related to human values and food preferences, a list of eleven food values was compiled. Results reveal that on average the values of safety, nutrition, taste, and price were among the most important to consumers, whereas the values of fairness, tradition, and origin were among the least important; however, there was significant heterogeneity in the relative importance placed on food values. Results indicate that food values are significantly related to consumers' stated and revealed preferences for organic food. Copyright 2009, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Jayson L. Lusk & Brian C. Briggeman, 2009. "Food Values," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(1), pages 184-196.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:91:y:2009:i:1:p:184-196

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    References listed on IDEAS

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