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Economic Activity Regulation And Competition Assessment


  • Berinde Mihai



In a broad sense, the term „competition” defines the relations between economic operators acting on the same market seeking attainment of certain interests in economic freedom conditions. The need for regulations in the area of competition stems from the nature of free, open market economy which is founded on the existence of fair competition between economic agents, competition which must be observed, maintained and protected by the law. Public authorities who issue various regulations should be cautious about how far this role is played in the economy and they way adopted regulations affect competition in the market. Hence, the need for prior assessment relating to the potential effect of a regulation on competition. It was proven in practice that some regulations may lead to measures that may affect competition directly or indirectly by: limiting the number or range of suppliers; limiting supplier capability to compete and reducing interests of suppliers to compete vigorously.

Suggested Citation

  • Berinde Mihai, 2010. "Economic Activity Regulation And Competition Assessment," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(1), pages 25-31, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ora:journl:v:1:y:2010:i:1:p:25-31

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Christiano, Lawrence J & Eichenbaum, Martin & Evans, Charles, 1996. "The Effects of Monetary Policy Shocks: Evidence from the Flow of Funds," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(1), pages 16-34, February.
    2. Bernanke, Ben S. & Mihov, Ilian, 1998. "The liquidity effect and long-run neutrality," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 149-194, December.
    3. Hafer, R W & Hein, Scott E, 1985. "On the Accuracy of Time-Series, Interest Rate, and Survey Forecasts of Inflation," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 58(4), pages 377-398, October.
    4. Pesaran, M. Hashem & Smith, Ron, 1995. "Estimating long-run relationships from dynamic heterogeneous panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 79-113, July.
    5. Hafer, R W & Hein, Scott E, 1990. "Forecasting Inflation Using Interest-Rate and Time-Series Models: Some International Evidence," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 63(1), pages 1-17, January.
    6. Gordon, David B & Leeper, Eric M, 1994. "The Dynamic Impacts of Monetary Policy: An Exercise in Tentative Identification," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(6), pages 1228-1247, December.
    7. Hanson, James A., 1985. "Inflation and imported input prices in some inflationary Latin American economies," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2-3), pages 395-410, August.
    8. Eric M. Leeper & Christopher A. Sims & Tao Zha, 1996. "What Does Monetary Policy Do?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 27(2), pages 1-78.
    9. Lucas, Robert Jr, 1976. "Econometric policy evaluation: A critique," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 19-46, January.
    10. Bomberger, W A & Makinen, G E, 1979. "Some Further Tests of the Harberger Inflation Model Using Qtrly Data," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(4), pages 629-644, July.
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    More about this item


    Competition; regulation; assessment;

    JEL classification:

    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation


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