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English Language Certificates - Meeting Requirements Or Simple Fashion

Author

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  • Horea Ioana

    () (University of Oradea, Faculty of Economic Scriences)

Abstract

The aim of the paper is to investigate the way in which internationally acknowledged language certificate tests are perceived. The questionnaire method, applied to a sample group of students, was implied in order to reveal various aspects of the expectations about these tests and certain opinions on their usefulness. Assessing several criteria, particular features concerning the perception of these tests can be remarked as initial baggage of the new students to work on and build next - as the study was conducted on first year students and thus outlines previous intakes.

Suggested Citation

  • Horea Ioana, 2008. "English Language Certificates - Meeting Requirements Or Simple Fashion," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(1), pages 607-612, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:ora:journl:v:1:y:2008:i:1:p:607-612
    as

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    File URL: http://steconomice.uoradea.ro/anale/volume/2008/v1-international-business-and-european-integration/108.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    internationally acknowledged language certificates; statistical overview; assessment of views;

    JEL classification:

    • A20 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - General
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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