IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/now/jirere/101.00000043.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Adapting to Climate Change: Costs, Benefits, and Modelling Approaches

Author

Listed:
  • Agrawala, Shardul
  • Bosello, Francesco
  • Carraro, Carlo
  • de Cian, Enrica
  • Lanzi, Elisa

Abstract

This paper provides a summary and a critical survey of the methodologies and results of the literature on the economics of adaptation. We divide the literature into two broad areas of research. First, we examine the studies that analyse adaptation from a bottom-up perspective. Second, we introduce the studies that examine adaptation using a top-down approach. The first group of studies investigates cost and benefits of adaptation at the sectoral, regional and global level. The second group includes theoretical literature on the relationship between mitigation and adaptation as well as emerging insights from some global Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs), which have recently been extended to include adaptation as an alternative and complementary policy option to mitigation.

Suggested Citation

  • Agrawala, Shardul & Bosello, Francesco & Carraro, Carlo & de Cian, Enrica & Lanzi, Elisa, 2011. "Adapting to Climate Change: Costs, Benefits, and Modelling Approaches," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 5(3), pages 245-284, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:now:jirere:101.00000043
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000043
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Gawel, Erik & Heuson, Clemens & Lehmann, Paul, 2012. "Efficient public adaptation to climate change: An investigation of drivers and barriers from a Public Choice perspective," UFZ Discussion Papers 14/2012, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Division of Social Sciences (ÖKUS).
    2. Schenker, Oliver & Stephan, Gunter, 2012. "Terms-of-trade and the funding of adaptation to climate change and variability: An empirical analysis," ZEW Discussion Papers 12-056, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    3. Anton Bondarev & Beat Hintermann & Frank C. Krysiak & Ralph Winkler, 2017. "The Intricacy of Adapting to Climate Change: Flood Protection as a Local Public Goods Game," CESifo Working Paper Series 6382, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Dr. Ulrike Lehr & Anne Nieters & Thomas Drosdowski, 2015. "Climate change adaptation and the German economy," GWS Discussion Paper Series 15-10, GWS - Institute of Economic Structures Research.
    5. Anthony Bonen & Prakash Loungani & Willi Semmler & Sebastian Koch, 2016. "Investing to Mitigate and Adapt to Climate Change; A Framework Model," IMF Working Papers 16/164, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Reinhard Mechler & Laurens Bouwer, 2015. "Understanding trends and projections of disaster losses and climate change: is vulnerability the missing link?," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 133(1), pages 23-35, November.
    7. Schenker, Oliver & Stephan, Gunter, 2014. "Give and take: How the funding of adaptation to climate change can improve the donor's terms-of-trade," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 44-55.
    8. Hassan Benchekroun & Farnaz Taherkhani, 2014. "Adaptation and the Allocation of Pollution Reduction Costs," Dynamic Games and Applications, Springer, vol. 4(1), pages 32-57, March.
    9. Paul Watkiss, 2015. "A review of the economics of adaptation and climate-resilient development," GRI Working Papers 205, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    10. Thierry Bréchet & Natali Hritonenko & Yuri Yatsenko, 2013. "Adaptation and Mitigation in Long-term Climate Policy," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 55(2), pages 217-243, June.
    11. Benchekroun, H. & Marrouch, W. & Ray Chaudhuri, A., 2011. "Adaptation Effectiveness and Free-Riding Incentives in International Environmental Agreements," Discussion Paper 2011-120, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    12. Fankhauser, Samuel & Sahni, Aditi & Savvas, Annie & Ward, John, 2016. "Where are the gaps in climate finance?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 64179, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    13. Martin Farnham & Peter Kennedy, 2015. "Adapting to Climate Change: Equilibrium Welfare Implications for Large and Small Economies," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 61(3), pages 345-363, July.
    14. Yuri Yatsenko, 2015. "Models and Games with Adaptation and Mitigation," CEEES Paper Series CE3S-01/15, European University at St. Petersburg, Department of Economics.
    15. Paul Watkiss & Alistair Hunt & William Blyth & Jillian Dyszynski, 2015. "The use of new economic decision support tools for adaptation assessment: A review of methods and applications, towards guidance on applicability," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 132(3), pages 401-416, October.
    16. Heuson, Clemens & Gawel, Erik & Gebhardt, Oliver & Hansjürgens, Bernd & Lehmann, Paul & Meyer, Volker & Schwarze, Reimund, 2012. "Fundamental questions on the economics of climate adaptation: Outlines of a new research programme," UFZ Reports 05/2012, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ).
    17. YATSENKO, Yuri & HRITONENKO, Natali & BRECHET, Thierry, 2014. "Modeling of environmental adaptation versus pollution mitigation," CORE Discussion Papers 2014006, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    18. Heuson, Clemens & Gawel, Erik & Gebhardt, Oliver & Hansjürgens, Bernd & Lehmann, Paul & Meyer, Volker & Schwarze, Reimund, 2012. "Ökonomische Grundfragen der Klimaanpassung: Umrisse eines neuen Forschungsprogramms," UFZ Reports 02/2012, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ).
    19. Neumann James E. & Strzepek Kenneth, 2014. "State of the literature on the economic impacts of climate change in the United States," Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, De Gruyter, vol. 5(3), pages 411-443, December.
    20. repec:kap:enreec:v:68:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10640-016-0056-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Richard S. J. Tol & Sebastian Petrick & Katrin Rehdanz, 2012. "The Impact of Temperature Changes on Residential Energy Use," Working Paper Series 4412, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Adaptation; Climate change; Climate change policies;

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:now:jirere:101.00000043. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Alet Heezemans). General contact details of provider: http://www.nowpublishers.com/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.