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Knowledge Exchange between High School Teachers: Factors of Intensity

Listed author(s):
  • Tatyana Andreeva
  • Anastasiya Sergeeva
  • Anastasiya Golubeva
  • Jaroslav Pavlov

Tatyana Andreyeva, Ph.D. in Economics, Associate Professor in the Department of Organizational Behavior and Personnel Management, Graduate School of Management, St. Petersburg University, Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation. Email: andreeva@gsom.pu.ru Address: 3 Volkhovsky Lane, Saint Petersburg, 199004, Russian Federation.Anastasiya Sergeyeva, research student at Graduate School of Management, St. Petersburg University, Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation. Email: sergeevan2000@gmail.com ddress: 3 Volkhovsky Lane, Saint Petersburg, 199004, Russian Federation.Anastasiya Golubeva, Ph.D. in Economics, senior teacher in the Department of Public Administration, Graduate School of Management, St. Petersburg University, Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation. Email: golubeva@gsom.pu.ru Address: 3 Volkhovsky Lane, Saint Petersburg, 199004, Russian Federation.Yaroslav Pavlov, research student at Graduate School of Management, St. Petersburg University, Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation. Email: yaroslav.pavlov@gmail.com Address: 3 Volkhovsky Lane, Saint Petersburg, 199004, Russian Federation.Based on a teacher questionnaire, factors influencing the intensity of knowledge exchange between high school teachers have been analyzed. The theoretic model adjusted by the survey for public institutions, such as high schools, includes the following factors explaining involvement of teachers in exchanging knowledge with their colleagues: extrinsic motivation (an inducement for activity coming from expected external benefits), intrinsic motivation (an impulse related to getting satisfaction from the nature and the process of activity), possibility (represented as an organizational culture), and capacity to share knowledge.It has been established that intensity of knowledge exchange depends positively on the intrinsic motivation of an individual as well as on the organizational culture supporting the process of exchange. Extrinsic motivation does not influence the intensity directly but contributes to it through strengthening intrinsic motivation.There is no statistically important relation between occupational experience and intensity of knowledge exchange, which means that capacity to exchange knowledge does not develop with the years of experience but is rather determined by skills of self-reflection and tacit knowledge externalization.Recommendations have been given to school principals and other school managers to help them develop teachers intrinsic motivation to exchange knowledge and to create a supporting organizational culture and other factors stimulating knowledge exchange between school teachers.

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Article provided by Higher School of Economics in its journal Educational Studies.

Volume (Year): (2013)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 154-187

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Handle: RePEc:nos:voprob:2013:i:2:p:154-187
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