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Domestic and International Remittances and Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Narges Ebadi

    (McGill University, Canada)

  • Davod Ahmadi

    (McGill Institute for Global Food Security, McGill University, Canada)

  • Hugo Melgar-Quiñonez

    (School of Human Nutrition, McGill University, Canada)

Abstract

The amount of remittances to developing counties, defined as the flow of monetary and non-monetary goods, has increased globally and has surpassed the amount of money spent on foreign aid in these developing countries. The impact of remittances on households’ purchasing power has been studied; however, its link to food security status is yet to be explored. This paper quantitatively analyses the relationship between food security status (measured using the Food Insecurity Experience Scale) and the receipt of domestic/ international or both remittances on households in sub- Saharan Africa. Data are derived from the Gallup World Poll from the years 2014-2017. Multinomial logistic regression models and binary logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze the data. Results showed that remittance recipients had significantly higher household incomes (especially if the remittance was coming internationally and domestically), lived with significantly more household members (7 or more members), and were more likely to be separated (including divorced or widowed). Households that received domestic remittances had significantly higher odds of being food insecure than households receiving no remittances. Conversely, households receiving remittances internationally or a combination of domestic and international remittances had significantly lower odds of food insecurity compared to non-receivers. This study found that receiving remittances affect the food security status of people living in SSA countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Narges Ebadi & Davod Ahmadi & Hugo Melgar-Quiñonez, 2020. "Domestic and International Remittances and Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa," Remittances Review, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 5(1), pages 37-54, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:mig:remrev:v:5:y:2020:i:1:p:37-54
    DOI: https://doi.org/10.33182/rr.v5i1.842
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Domestic remittances; international remittances; food security status; sub-Saharan Africa;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances

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