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Migration and Trade: Complements or Substitutes? Evidence from Turkish Migration to Germany

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  • Sule Akkoyunlu
  • Boriss Siliverstovs

Abstract

This study investigates whether migration and trade can be regarded as complements or substitutes using the data on Turkish migration to Germany for the period 1963-2004. In contrast to previous studies that investigated this question using gravity equations, we conduct our analysis using the cointegration framework. In line with the previous literature, our results support the view that migration and trade are complements.

Suggested Citation

  • Sule Akkoyunlu & Boriss Siliverstovs, 2009. "Migration and Trade: Complements or Substitutes? Evidence from Turkish Migration to Germany," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(5), pages 47-61, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:emfitr:v:45:y:2009:i:5:p:47-61
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Campaniello, Nadia, 2014. "The causal effect of trade on migration: Evidence from countries of the Euro-Mediterranean partnership," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 223-233.
    2. Giulia Bettin & Alessia Lo Turco, 2012. "A Cross-Country View on South-North Migration and Trade: Dissecting the Channels," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(4), pages 4-29, July.
    3. Giulia Bettin & Alessia Lo Turco, 2012. "A Cross-Country View on South-North Migration and Trade: Dissecting the Channels," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 48(4), pages 4-29, July.

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