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Modeling Structural Change: An Application to the New EU Member States and Accession Candidates

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  • Ulrich Thiessen
  • Paul Gregory

Abstract

The rapid changes in the transition economies must be evaluated in a comparative context. This paper provides a comprehensive comparative analysis using a large panel data set of market economies as a reference point. We wish to establish the extent and speed with which the structures of the transition economies converge toward other country groups, ranked according to income levels. The exercise provides an alternate measure of transition success, grounded in quantitative rather than subjective indicators. It also shows future sectoral growth patterns assuming that remaining structural distortions continue to be removed.

Suggested Citation

  • Ulrich Thiessen & Paul Gregory, 2007. "Modeling Structural Change: An Application to the New EU Member States and Accession Candidates," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(4), pages 5-35, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:eaeuec:v:45:y:2007:i:4:p:5-35
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    1. Rutherford, Thomas F., 1995. "Extension of GAMS for complementarity problems arising in applied economic analysis," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 19(8), pages 1299-1324, November.
    2. Andrew B. Abel, 2003. "The Effects of a Baby Boom on Stock Prices and Capital Accumulation in the Presence of Social Security," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(2), pages 551-578, March.
    3. James M. Poterba, 2001. "Demographic Structure And Asset Returns," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, pages 565-584.
    4. Modigliani, Franco, 1986. "Life Cycle, Individual Thrift, and the Wealth of Nations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 297-313.
    5. Böhringer, Christoph & Rutherford, Thomas Fox & Wiegard, Wolfgang, 2003. "Computable general equilibrium analysis: Opening a black box," ZEW Discussion Papers 03-56, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
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