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Avoiding Another Meltdown

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  • James Crotty
  • Gerald Epstein

Abstract

The authors argue that the current financial crisis, the worst since the Great Depression, can be seen as the latest phase in the evolution of financial markets under a radical financial deregulation process that began in the late 1970s. Deregulation accompanied by rapid financial innovation stimulated powerful booms that ended in crises. But governments responded to the crises with new bailouts that allowed new expansions to begin. As a result, financial markets have become ever larger, and the crises have become more threatening to society, which forces governments to enact ever larger bailouts. The authors provide a comprehensive set of regulatory solutions they believe will sharply reduce financial instability.

Suggested Citation

  • James Crotty & Gerald Epstein, 2009. "Avoiding Another Meltdown," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(1), pages 5-26.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:challe:v:52:y:2009:i:1:p:5-26 DOI: 10.2753/0577-5132520101
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Carmen M. Reinhart & Graciela L. Kaminsky, 1999. "The Twin Crises: The Causes of Banking and Balance-of-Payments Problems," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 473-500.
    2. Glick, Reuven & Rose, Andrew K., 1999. "Contagion and trade: Why are currency crises regional?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 603-617, August.
    3. Graciela L. Kaminsky & Carmen M. Reinhart, 2001. "Bank Lending and Contagion: Evidence from the Asian Crisis," NBER Chapters,in: Regional and Global Capital Flows: Macroeconomic Causes and Consequences, NBER-EASE Volume 10, pages 73-99 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Kaminsky, Graciela L. & Reinhart, Carmen M., 2000. "On crises, contagion, and confusion," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 145-168.
    5. Carmen M. Reinhart & Sara Calvo, 1996. "Capital Flows to Latin America: Is There Evidence of Contagion Effects?," Peterson Institute Press: Chapters,in: Guillermo A. Calvo & Morris Goldstein & Eduard Hochreiter (ed.), Private Capital Flows to Emerging Markets After the Mexican Crisis, pages 151-171 Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    6. Carmen M. Reinhart & Sara Calvo, 1996. "Capital Flows to Latin America: Is There Evidence of Contagion Effects?," Peterson Institute Press: Chapters,in: Guillermo A. Calvo & Morris Goldstein & Eduard Hochreiter (ed.), Private Capital Flows to Emerging Markets After the Mexican Crisis, pages 151-171 Peterson Institute for International Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. James Crotty, 2009. "The Bonus-Driven “Rainmaker” Financial Firm: How These Firms Enrich Top Employees, Destroy Shareholder Value and Create Systemic Financial Instability," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2009-13, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
    2. Staubli, Stefan & Zweimüller, Josef, 2011. "Does Raising the Retirement Age Increase Employment of Older Workers?," CEPR Discussion Papers 8510, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Strachman, Eduardo & Fucidji, José Ricardo, 2010. "The Current Financial and Economic Crisis: Empirical and Methodological Issues," MPRA Paper 27130, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Josef Falkinger, 2012. "Verantwortliches Handeln - Gestalten von Ordnung," ECON - Working Papers 100, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.

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