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Examining large-scale time-use files through graphic representation

Author

Listed:
  • William Michelson

    () (Department of Sociology, University of Toronto)

  • David Crouse

    () (Department of Sociology, University of Toronto)

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the utility of graphic means to add to the comprehension of time-use analysis. The paper traces the development of several graphic approaches, from the logic of plotting a single case in multidimensional space to several ways of examining time-use dynamics graphically without limitations on sample size. It draws on pilot studies from the FAMITEL research project on telecommuting and extends to Statistics Canada’s General Social Survey in 1998 with time-use data (GSS12). The examples of graphic development focus on aspects of the daily lives of teleworkers, to illustrate in this context how graphic representation can illuminate much-discussed differences between the complex pattern of daily life characterizing of these workers in comparison to conventional workers, regardless of the size of samples and subsamples. The graphic techniques discussed advance understanding of these phenomena by presenting visual evidence of differential patterns reflecting the interrelations between the several components of time-use as well as reflecting the different times in the day in which phenomena occur, within and between analytic subgroups. As in many other analyses, gender can be literally seen in the graphics as an important differentiating factor, even within occupational situations.

Suggested Citation

  • William Michelson & David Crouse, 2004. "Examining large-scale time-use files through graphic representation," electronic International Journal of Time Use Research, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)) and The International Association for Time Use Research (IATUR), vol. 1(1), pages 85-100, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:leu:journl:2004:vol1:p85-100
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    File URL: http://www2.leuphana.de/ffb/eijtur/pdf/volumes/eIJTUR-1-1.pdf#page=92
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dr. Jennifer Baxter, 2011. "An examination of the characteristics and time use of those who have unfilled spare time," electronic International Journal of Time Use Research, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)) and The International Association for Time Use Research (IATUR), vol. 8(1), pages 30-61, November.
    2. Hamrick, Karen S. & Hopkins, David & McClelland, Ket, 2008. "How Much Time Do Americans Spend Eating?," Amber Waves, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, June.
    3. Aizer, Anna, 2004. "Home alone: supervision after school and child behavior," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(9-10), pages 1835-1848, August.
    4. Rebecca Utz, 2014. "Walking the Dog: The Effect of Pet Ownership on Human Health and Health Behaviors," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 116(2), pages 327-339, April.
    5. Anne Roeters & Mariëlle Cloïn & Tanja van der Lippe, 2014. "Solitary Time and Mental Health in the Netherlands," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 119(2), pages 925-941, November.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ana Rute Cardoso & Daniel S. Hamermesh & José Varejao, 2012. "The Timing of Labor Demand," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 105-106, pages 15-34.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    telework; home-based work; graphic analysis; tempogram; composite tempogram;

    JEL classification:

    • C10 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - General
    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • D30 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - General
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General

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