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Growth and the Welfare State in the EU: A Causality Analysis

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  • Herce, Jose A
  • Sosvilla-Rivero, Simon
  • de Lucio, Juan Jose

Abstract

In this paper, we test for causality between GDP growth and social protection expenditure in the European Union. To that end, we apply Hsiao's (1981) sequential procedure to data for twelve EU countries along the 1970-94 period. Our results suggest that, for Belgium, Germany, Ireland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain, causality runs only from social protection growth to GDP growth, while for Denmark, France, Greece, Italy, and the United Kingdom, no causality is found between social protection growth and GDP growth. Copyright 2001 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

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  • Herce, Jose A & Sosvilla-Rivero, Simon & de Lucio, Juan Jose, 2001. "Growth and the Welfare State in the EU: A Causality Analysis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 109(1-2), pages 55-68, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:109:y:2001:i:1-2:p:55-68
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    Cited by:

    1. Gerdie Everaert & Freddy Heylen & Ruben Schoonackers, 2015. "Fiscal policy and TFP in the OECD: measuring direct and indirect effects," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 605-640, September.
    2. Simón Sosvilla-Rivero & José A. Herce & Juan-José. de Lucio, "undated". "Convergence in social protection across EU countries, 1970-1999," Working Papers 2003-01, FEDEA.
    3. Alfredo M. Pereira & Jorge M. Andraz, 2014. "On the Long-Term Macroeconomic Effects of Social Security Spending: Evidence for 12 EU Countries," CEFAGE-UE Working Papers 2014_08, University of Evora, CEFAGE-UE (Portugal).
    4. Beraldo, Sergio & Montolio, Daniel & Turati, Gilberto, 2009. "Healthy, educated and wealthy: A primer on the impact of public and private welfare expenditures on economic growth," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 946-956, December.
    5. R. Schoonackers & F. Heylen, 2011. "Fiscal Policy and TFP in the OECD: A Non-Stationary Panel Approach," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 11/701, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    6. Sergio Beraldo & Daniel Montolio Estivill & Gilberto Turati, 2005. "Healthy, Educated and Wealthy: Is the Welfare State Really Harmful for Growth?," Working Papers in Economics 127, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia.
    7. Marta Simões & Adelaide Duarte & João Sousa Andrade, 2014. "Assessing the Impact of the Welfare State on Economic Growth: A Survey of Recent Developments," GEMF Working Papers 2014-20, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.

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