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Logical Deficiencies in Spatial Models: A Constructive Critique


  • Milyo, Jeffrey


A fundamental property of any good theory is logical consistency. However, two common assumptions in the rational choice approach to political analysis (that induced preferences over policy are separable and that such preferences are independent of changes in exogenous factors) are not consistent with the archetypal assumptions of individual utility maximization. These particular pathologies of spatial models of politics have not been well recognized in the political science literature. Copyright 2000 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Milyo, Jeffrey, 2000. "Logical Deficiencies in Spatial Models: A Constructive Critique," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 105(3-4), pages 273-289, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:105:y:2000:i:3-4:p:273-89

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ray C. Fair, 1996. "Econometrics and Presidential Elections," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(3), pages 89-102, Summer.
    2. Palda, Kristian S, 1975. "The Effect of Expenditure on Political Success," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(3), pages 745-771, December.
    3. repec:cup:apsrev:v:72:y:1978:i:02:p:469-491_15 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Palda, Kristian S, 1975. "The Effect of Expenditure on Political Success: Reply," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(3), pages 779-780, December.
    5. K. Palda & Kristian Palda, 1985. "Ceilings on campaign spending: Hypothesis and partial test with Canadian data," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 45(3), pages 313-331, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Stefano Benati & Giuseppe Vittucci Marzetti, 2013. "Probabilistic spatial power indexes," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 40(2), pages 391-410, February.
    2. Donald Wittman, 2005. "Valence characteristics, costly policy and the median-crossing property: A diagrammatic exposition," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 124(3), pages 365-382, September.
    3. repec:spr:grdene:v:24:y:2015:i:4:d:10.1007_s10726-014-9408-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:spr:grdene:v:24:y:2015:i:1:d:10.1007_s10726-014-9378-6 is not listed on IDEAS

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