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Political Competition and Voter Mobility


  • Petchey, Jeffrey


The existing model of political competition is extended to allow voters to live in different regions and to migrate between regions in response to an inter-regional transfer policy. We then show that regions have a different "weight" in the expected vote function of political parties. This gives parties an incentive to bias the transfer policy in favour of relatively high weight regions, with potentially adverse efficiency and equity effects. However, we then show that parties always propose efficient and equitable regional transfers, regardless of whether regions have different weights, if there is some mobility of citizens across regions. Mobility constrains parties to act efficiently and equitably even though they face an incentive to act otherwise. However, when voters are immobile political competition leads to inequitable though efficient outcomes. Copyright 2000 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Petchey, Jeffrey, 2000. "Political Competition and Voter Mobility," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 105(3-4), pages 231-243, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:105:y:2000:i:3-4:p:231-43

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. repec:cup:apsrev:v:71:y:1977:i:04:p:1467-1487_26 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Torsten Persson & Gerard Roland & Guido Tabellini, 2003. "How Do Electoral Rules Shape Party Structures, Government Coalitions and Economic Policies?," Working Papers 251, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    3. J. Ferris & Soo-Bin Park & Stanley Winer, 2008. "Studying the role of political competition in the evolution of government size over long horizons," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 137(1), pages 369-401, October.
    4. Allen, Stuart D. & McCrickard, Donald L., 1991. "The influence of elections on federal reserve behavior," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 51-55, September.
    5. Burton A. Abrams, 2006. "How Richard Nixon Pressured Arthur Burns: Evidence from the Nixon Tapes," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(4), pages 177-188, Fall.
    6. Siklos,Pierre L., 2006. "The Changing Face of Central Banking," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521034494, May.
    7. William D. Nordhaus, 1975. "The Political Business Cycle," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 42(2), pages 169-190.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rodriguez-Oreggia, Eduardo & Costa-Font, Joan & Luna Pla, Dario, 2002. "Political competition and the allocation of public investment in Mexico," ERSA conference papers ersa02p260, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Bucovetsky, S., 2011. "Incentive equivalence with fixed migration costs," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(11), pages 1292-1301.

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