IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/jtecht/v27y2002i3p219-31.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Types of Knowledge and Their Roles in Technology Transfer

Author

Listed:
  • Gorman, Michael E

Abstract

At the dawn of a new millennium, the most valuable global commodity is knowledge, particularly new knowledge about technology that may give a culture, a company and/or a laboratory an advantage. This paper begins with examples of tacit technology transfer, including atomic weapons technology, whose development suggests that failure to preserve tacit knowledge could lead to uninvention. This discussion is followed by a taxonomy of knowledge, distinguishing between four types--information, skills, judgement and wisdom. These types are used to refine the distinction between tacit and explicit knowledge, including their role in teams. Copyright 2002 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Gorman, Michael E, 2002. "Types of Knowledge and Their Roles in Technology Transfer," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 27(3), pages 219-231, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:27:y:2002:i:3:p:219-31
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://journals.kluweronline.com/issn/0892-9912/contents
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Pamela Mueller, 2005. "Exploring the Knowledge Filter - How Entrepreneurship and University-Industry Relations Drive Economic Growth," ERSA conference papers ersa05p610, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Fritjof Karnani, 2013. "The university’s unknown knowledge: tacit knowledge, technology transfer and university spin-offs findings from an empirical study based on the theory of knowledge," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 38(3), pages 235-250, June.
    3. Isabel Díez-Vial & Marta Fernández-Olmos, 2015. "Knowledge spillovers in science and technology parks: how can firms benefit most?," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 70-84, February.
    4. Pamela Mueller, 2007. "Exploiting Entrepreneurial Opportunities: The Impact of Entrepreneurship on Growth," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 28(4), pages 355-362, April.
    5. Mathew Manimala & K. Thomas, 2013. "Learning Needs of Technology Transfer: Coping with Discontinuities and Disruptions," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 4(4), pages 511-539, December.
    6. repec:kap:jtecht:v:42:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10961-016-9502-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. D. Thorleuchter & D. Van Den Poel, 2012. "Protecting Research and Technology from Espionage," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 12/824, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:27:y:2002:i:3:p:219-31. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.