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Office Employment Growth and the Changing Function of Cities



The proportion of a city's local and regionally/nationally supported office employment changes as the city assumes more central place functions. Certain mixes of office employment should reflect the central place function of the city and promote office growth. Forty-five cities are studied using data from 1997, 1982, and 1985. The results indicate that the variance of office employment does not help predict a city's growth, but that certain cluster categories of office employment are associated with office employment growth. Finally, the results indicate that office employment profiles of cities have become more homogenized over time.

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  • Leon G. Shilton & James R. Webb, 1992. "Office Employment Growth and the Changing Function of Cities," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 7(1), pages 73-90.
  • Handle: RePEc:jre:issued:v:7:n:1:1992:p:73-90

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Terry V. Grissom & David Hartzell & Crocker H. Liu, 1987. "An Approach to Industrial Real Estate Market Segmentation and Valuation Using the Arbitrage Pricing Paradigm," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 15(3), pages 199-219.
    2. David Hartzell & John Hekman & Mike Miles, 1986. "Diversification Categories in Investment Real Estate," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 14(2), pages 230-254.
    3. David J. Hartzell & David G. Shulma & Vice President, 1987. "Refining the Analysis of Regional Diversification for Income-Producing Real Estate," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 2(2), pages 85-95.
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    JEL classification:

    • L85 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Real Estate Services


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