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The Evolution of the American Real Estate Society



The American Real Estate Society (ARES) started with the need for real estate academics to increase their applied research and teaching skills and grew rapidly as research practitioners realized the benefits of working with academics in their field. From its humble beginnings, ARES has grown to be the largest organization of real estate researchers in the world and has spawned a number of new real estate societies on a number of continents. The history of the ARES approach to being innovative and inclusive to all real estate thought leaders is chronicled in this article by two authors who met at one of the early pre-ARES meetings and have been both real estate academics and practitioners in their careers.

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  • Glenn R. Mueller & Charles H. Wurtzebach, 1996. "The Evolution of the American Real Estate Society," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 12(2), pages 163-166.
  • Handle: RePEc:jre:issued:v:12:n:2:1996:p:163-166

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Palmquist, Raymond B, 1984. "Estimating the Demand for the Characteristics of Housing," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 66(3), pages 394-404, August.
    2. Kane, Edward J, 1990. " Principal-Agent Problems in S&L Salvage," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 45(3), pages 755-764, July.
    3. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    4. Karl L. Guntermann & Stefan Norrbin, 1987. "Explaining the Variability of Apartment Rents," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 15(4), pages 321-340.
    5. Charles A. Smith & Mark J. Kroll, 1989. "Utility Theory and Rent Optimization: Utilizing Cluster Analysis to Segment Rental Markets," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 4(1), pages 61-71.
    6. James D. Shilling & John D. Benjamin & C.F. Sirmans, 1990. "Estimating Net Realizable Value for Distressed Real Estate," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 5(1), pages 129-140.
    7. Halvorsen, Robert & Palmquist, Raymond, 1980. "The Interpretation of Dummy Variables in Semilogarithmic Equations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 474-475, June.
    8. Fred A. Forgey & Ronald C. Rutherford & Michael L. VanBuskirk, 1994. "Effect of Foreclosure Status on Residential Selling Price," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 9(3), pages 313-318.
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    JEL classification:

    • L85 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Real Estate Services


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