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The Macroeconomics of Loss of Fulltime Student Status or the Fiscal Consequences of Passing or Not Passing an Exam


  • Petar Filipic

    (Faculty of Economics, Split, Croatia)


This article is the first systematic attempt at an overview of the extent of fiscal and non-fiscal support to students in Croatia, taking University of Split as an example. In detail, the author analyses, classifies and presents eleven fiscal and eight non-fiscal subsidies to students. Because of the very high level of subsidy per student (per user), the author goes on to explain in detail the effect of the loss of the status of fulltime student on the fiscal system as a whole, and then the consequences of loss of status of fulltime student at the level of the marginal exam. The paper refers to the problem of the allocative inefficiency of the state in the funding of the tertiary-level institutions in Croatia and provides an up-to-date contribution for the discussion of the fiscal effects of subsidies, the quality of higher education and the total costs of the courses of students in Croatian higher education institutions.

Suggested Citation

  • Petar Filipic, 2009. "The Macroeconomics of Loss of Fulltime Student Status or the Fiscal Consequences of Passing or Not Passing an Exam," Financial Theory and Practice, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 33(1), pages 1-23.
  • Handle: RePEc:ipf:finteo:v:33:y:2009:i:1:p:1-27

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Rafael Di Tella & Robert J. MacCulloch & Andrew J. Oswald, 2003. "The Macroeconomics of Happiness," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(4), pages 809-827, November.
    2. Robert J. MacCulloch & Rafael Di Tella & Andrew J. Oswald, 2001. "Preferences over Inflation and Unemployment: Evidence from Surveys of Happiness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 335-341, March.
    3. Hayo, Bernd & Seifert, Wolfgang, 2003. "Subjective economic well-being in Eastern Europe," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 329-348, June.
    4. Robert J. Shiller, 1997. "Why Do People Dislike Inflation?," NBER Chapters,in: Reducing Inflation: Motivation and Strategy, pages 13-70 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Green, Francis & Felstead, Alan & Burchell, Brendan, 2000. " Job Insecurity and the Difficulty of Regaining Employment: An Empirical Study of Unemployment Expectations," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 62(0), pages 855-883, Special I.
    6. Paul, Satya, 2001. "A Welfare Loss Measure of Unemployment with an Empirical Illustration," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 69(2), pages 148-163, March.
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