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A General Model of Comparative Advantage with Two Factors and a Continuum of Goods


  • Xu, Yingfeng


This paper develops a general model of comparative advantage with two factors and a continuum of goods, which incorporates the Ricardian and Heckscher-Ohlin-Samuelson models as two special cases and which can illustrate how technology, factor endowments, world income, world prices, and demand preferences influence trade pattern with a single graph. Further, the author has derived an intuitive solution of a unique trade pattern under factor price equalization: countries specialize in goods that use intensively abundant factors and some middle goods in terms of capital intensity are not traded even in the absence of trade barriers. Copyright 1993 by Economics Department of the University of Pennsylvania and the Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Xu, Yingfeng, 1993. "A General Model of Comparative Advantage with Two Factors and a Continuum of Goods," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 34(2), pages 365-380, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:34:y:1993:i:2:p:365-80

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Alan L. Gustman & Thomas L. Steinmeier, 1984. "Partial Retirement and the Analysis of Retirement Behavior," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 37(3), pages 403-415, April.
    2. Lundberg, Shelly J, 1985. "Tied Wage-Hours Offers and the Endogeneity of Wages," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(3), pages 405-410, August.
    3. Moffitt, Robert, 1982. "The Tobit Model, Hours of Work and Institutional Constraints," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 64(3), pages 510-515, August.
    4. Rosen, Harvey S, 1976. "Taxes in a Labor Supply Model with Joint Wage-Hours Determination," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 44(3), pages 485-507, May.
    5. Deaton, Angus & Meullbauer, John, 1981. "Functional Forms for Labor Supply and Commodity Demands with and without Quantity Restrictions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1521-1532, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bernstein, Jeffrey R. & Weinstein, David E., 2002. "Do endowments predict the location of production?: Evidence from national and international data," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 55-76, January.
    2. Artal-Tur, Andrés & Castillo-Giménez, Juana & Llano-Verduras, Carlos & Requena-Silvente, Francisco, 2011. "The factor content of regional bilateral trade: The role of technology and demand," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 157-172, April.
    3. Donald R. Davis & David E. Weinstein, 2001. "An Account of Global Factor Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1423-1453, December.
    4. Kei-Mu Yi, 2003. "Can Vertical Specialization Explain the Growth of World Trade?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 111(1), pages 52-102, February.
    5. Jiro AKITA & Kwan Koo YUN, 2004. "Technological Differences and the Impact of Trade on Wages," Econometric Society 2004 Far Eastern Meetings 757, Econometric Society.
    6. Davis, Donald R. & Weinstein, David E., 2003. "Why countries trade: Insights from firm-level data," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 432-447, December.

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