IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Consequences of Refugee Crises on German Economy

Listed author(s):
  • Raluca-Marilena MIHÄ‚LCIOIU

    ()

    (Spiru Haret University, 13 Ion Ghica Street, Bucharest, 030045, Romania)

Registered author(s):

    Even in 2016 thousands of new refugees arrived to Germany. Many of them are potential qualified workers to strengthen the German economy. But there are also critical consequences. Not any Syrian that arrived Germany is a doctor. Not any refugee woman is a nurse. Many refugees have no work experience and possess low formal vocational qualifications. Exactly the academic and vocational qualifications play a crucial role when it comes to successfully integration refugees into German society. For migrants to find a job in Germany, it is very important that the Qualifications they bring with them are in demand on the German labor market. On the one hand, it is crucial that they learn German, on the other hand they should seek German recognition of their academic and vocational certificates. This paper aims to present an overview of the consequences of high refugee immigration on German Economy.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://icesba.eu/RePEc/icb/wpaper/ICESBA2016_13_MIHALCIOIU_p_114-117.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Article provided by Spiru Haret University in its journal Published in Procedia of Economics and Business Administration.

    Volume (Year): 3 (2016)
    Issue (Month): 1 (October)
    Pages: 114-117

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:icb:wpaper:v:3:y:2016:i:1:114-117
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://icesba.eu

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as
    in new window


    1. Daumann, Volker & Dietz, Martin & Knapp, Barbara & Strien, Karsten, 2015. "Early Intervention - Modellprojekt zur frühzeitigen Arbeitsmarktintegration von Asylbewerberinnen und Asylbewerbern : Ergebnisse der qualitativen Begleitforschung," IAB-Forschungsbericht 201503, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:icb:wpaper:v:3:y:2016:i:1:114-117. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Rocsana Bucea-Manea-Tonis)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.