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Chinese Foreign Policy in Transition: Trends and Implications

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  • Baohui Zhang

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Abstract

Chinese foreign policy has been transformed in recent years. This article seeks to provide a systematic analysis of the most salient features of the new Chinese foreign policy. It identifies five such features. Based on these features, the article suggests that China is poised to become a true global power. This view differs significantly from Gerald Segal’s famous claim in 1999 that China was no more than a middle power. The article utilizes many current Chinese sources to help readers understand China’s new motives and goals in international and regional affairs.

Suggested Citation

  • Baohui Zhang, 2010. "Chinese Foreign Policy in Transition: Trends and Implications," Journal of Current Chinese Affairs - China aktuell, Institute of Asian Studies, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies, Hamburg, vol. 39(2), pages 39-68.
  • Handle: RePEc:gig:chaktu:v:39:y:2010:i:2:p:39-68
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    File URL: http://hup.sub.uni-hamburg.de/giga/jcca/article/view/254
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. White, Gordon & Howell, Jude A. & Shang Xiaoyuan,, 1996. "In Search of Civil Society: Market Reform and Social Change in Contemporary China," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198289562.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fernanda Ihéu & Sandra Pereira, 2012. "The Chinese “go global” policy and the Portuguese kinship," CEsA Working Papers 110, CEsA - Center of African, Asian and Latin American Studies.
    2. Georg Strüver, 2012. "What Friends Are Made Of: Bilateral Linkages and Domestic Drivers of Foreign Policy Alignment with China," GIGA Working Paper Series 209, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.

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