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Nationalism to Go - Coke Commercials between Lifestyle and Political Myth

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  • Nora Frisch

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Abstract

Nationalism in the sense of symbols or actions glorifying the fatherland can be detected in many Chinese commercials today. In the form of a mythical narration, various aspects of an idealized China image are communicated, an image designed to bring about a sense of identity for all Chinese people. While first and foremost serving consumer preferences, these emotionally charged constructions of a “super nation” can also be interpreted in an ideological sense. Seen against the background of the public discourse on patriotism underway since 1989, this “Sinization” of advertising suggests the more or less subtle influence of party-state propaganda. In analysing TV commercials and interpreting their content, the ambivalent position and general background of advertisers must, however, be kept in mind. Even as they attempt to address and leverage popular trends, these advertisers are part of the community that has shaped the worldviews and values (some of them ideological) that are also reflected in the ads.

Suggested Citation

  • Nora Frisch, 2009. "Nationalism to Go - Coke Commercials between Lifestyle and Political Myth," Journal of Current Chinese Affairs - China aktuell, Institute of Asian Studies, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies, Hamburg, vol. 38(2), pages 85-120.
  • Handle: RePEc:gig:chaktu:v:38:y:2009:i:2:p:85-120
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    File URL: http://hup.sub.uni-hamburg.de/giga/jcca/article/view/46/46
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James Galbraith & Sara Hsu & Wenjie Zhang, 2009. "Beijing Bubble, Beijing Bust: Inequality, Trade, and Capital Inflow into China," Journal of Current Chinese Affairs - China aktuell, Institute of Asian Studies, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies, Hamburg, vol. 38(2), pages 3-26.
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