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Educating Professionals for Sustainable Futures

Author

Listed:
  • Hille Janhonen-Abruquah

    () (Faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki 00014, Finland)

  • Jenni Topp

    () (Faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki 00014, Finland)

  • Hanna Posti-Ahokas

    () (Faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki 00014, Finland)

Abstract

The recent discourse on sustainability science calls for interdisciplinary research. The home economics science approach ranges from individual actions to the involvement of communities and societies at large, and thus it can provide important perspectives on cultural sustainability. The aim of the research is to study the linkage between cultural sustainability and service sector education to support the creation of sustainable professions. In the present small-scale empirical study, the food service degree curriculum of a Finnish vocational college and teachers’ group interview data were analyzed to find how cultural sustainability is presented in the curriculum and how it is understood by teachers and integrated into teaching practices. Previous cultural sustainability research identifies four perspectives of cultural sustainability: (1) vitality of cultural traditions; (2) economic starting point; (3) diversity together with maintenance of local culture; and (4) possible influence on the balance between human actions and environment. Findings indicate that sustainability, including cultural sustainability, is integrated in the curriculum and considered important by teachers. Translating these into practice remains a challenge. The balance between human and nature was mostly understood as recycling, use of public transport, sustainable consumption, and taking trips to the nature nearby. Cultural sustainability as a concept is not well known, although themes such as multicultural issues, equality, charity, and environmental responsibility were included in teachers’ practical lessons daily. Feasts and celebrations in learning were opportunities to view cultural sustainability widely. This paper provides a way forward for the teachers to develop further their pedagogical practices.

Suggested Citation

  • Hille Janhonen-Abruquah & Jenni Topp & Hanna Posti-Ahokas, 2018. "Educating Professionals for Sustainable Futures," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(3), pages 1-12, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:3:p:592-:d:133428
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2016:i:2:p:167:d:63753 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Jelle Boeve-de Pauw & Niklas Gericke & Daniel Olsson & Teresa Berglund, 2015. "The Effectiveness of Education for Sustainable Development," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(11), pages 1-25, November.
    3. Gisela Cebrián & Mercè Junyent, 2015. "Competencies in Education for Sustainable Development: Exploring the Student Teachers’ Views," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(3), pages 1-19, March.
    4. Vanderleia Martins Lohn & Rafael Tezza & Graziela Dias Alperstedt & Lucila M. S. Campos, 2017. "Future Professionals: A Study of Sustainable Behavior," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(3), pages 1-15, March.
    5. Katriina Soini & Joost Dessein, 2016. "Culture-Sustainability Relation: Towards a Conceptual Framework," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(2), pages 1-12, February.
    6. repec:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2016:i:2:p:-:d:63753 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nuttasorn Ketprapakorn & Sooksan Kantabutra, 2019. "Sustainable Social Enterprise Model: Relationships and Consequences," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(14), pages 1-39, July.
    2. Leire Agirreazkuenaga, 2019. "Embedding Sustainable Development Goals in Education. Teachers’ Perspective about Education for Sustainability in the Basque Autonomous Community," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(5), pages 1-17, March.
    3. Magdalena Sobocińska, 2019. "The Role of Marketing in Cultural Institutions in the Context of Assumptions of Sustainable Development Concept—A Polish Case Study," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(11), pages 1-15, June.
    4. Ling Wang & Gongliang Hu & Tiehua Zhou, 2018. "Semantic Analysis of Learners’ Emotional Tendencies on Online MOOC Education," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(6), pages 1-19, June.
    5. Izabela Luiza Pop & Anca Borza & Anuța Buiga & Diana Ighian & Rita Toader, 2019. "Achieving Cultural Sustainability in Museums: A Step Toward Sustainable Development," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(4), pages 1-22, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cultural sustainability; vocational education; home economics science;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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