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Bodily Practices as Vehicles for Dehumanization in an Institution for Mental Defectives

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  • Claudia Malacrida

    () (Department of Sociology, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, Alberta, T1K 4L2, Canada)

Abstract

This article analyzes the processes of dehumanization that occurred in the Michener Center, a total institution for the purported care and training of people deemed to be mental defectives[1] that operated in Alberta, Canada. I report on qualitative interviews with 22 survivors, three ex-workers, and the institutional archival record, drawing out the ways that dehumanization was accomplished through bodily means and the construction of embodied otherness along several axes. First, inmates’ bodies were erased or debased as unruly matter out of place that disturbed the order of rational modernity, a move that meant inmates were not seen as deserving or even requiring of normal human consideration. Spatial practices within the institution included panopticism and isolation, constructing inmates as not only docile but as unworthy of contact and interaction. Dehumanization was also seen as necessary to and facilitative of patient care; to produce inmates as subhuman permitted efficiency, but also neglect and abuse. Finally, practices of hygiene and sequestering the polluting bodies of those deemed mentally defective sustained and justified dehumanization. These practices had profound effects for inmates and also for those charged with caring for them.[1] This was the terminology used to describe people deemed to have intellectual disabilities during much of the 20 th century in the West.

Suggested Citation

  • Claudia Malacrida, 2012. "Bodily Practices as Vehicles for Dehumanization in an Institution for Mental Defectives," Societies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 2(4), pages 1-16, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsoctx:v:2:y:2012:i:4:p:286-301:d:21499
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jacqueline Low & Claudia Malacrida, 2013. "Embodied Action, Embodied Theory: Understanding the Body in Society," Societies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(3), pages 1-5, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    dehumanization; total institutions; Foucault; panopticon; matter out of place; docile bodies; institutional abuse; eugenics; Michener Center;

    JEL classification:

    • A13 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Social Values
    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • P - Economic Systems
    • P0 - Economic Systems - - General
    • P1 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems
    • P2 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies
    • P3 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions
    • P4 - Economic Systems - - Other Economic Systems
    • P5 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics

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