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Tick Size and Market Quality

Author

Listed:
  • David C. Porter
  • Daniel G. Weaver

Abstract

All of the US stock markets have reduced their respective minimum tick sizes. Since the three major US markets, the American Stock Exchange (AMEX), New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), and Nasdaq, all have different order-priority systems, the impact of the tick-size reduction on spread width, as well as other aspects of market quality, can differ across the markets. Given that previous research has established a link between spread width and a firm's cost of capital, this differing impact is important to firms in their exchange listing decision. This study examines changes in market quality across two different priority systems, price-time and price-sharing, following a reduction in the minimum tick size by the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSE) on April 15, 1996. We find that, following the reduction in minimum tick size on the TSE, spreads generally narrow and quoted depths decline for both priority systems. (Depth is defined as the total number of shares offered or sought at a price.) The effect is greatest on low-priced, high-volume stocks.

Suggested Citation

  • David C. Porter & Daniel G. Weaver, 1997. "Tick Size and Market Quality," Financial Management, Financial Management Association, vol. 26(4), Winter.
  • Handle: RePEc:fma:fmanag:porter97
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    Cited by:

    1. Harald Hau, 2006. "The Role of Transaction Costs for Financial Volatility: Evidence from the Paris Bourse," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 4(4), pages 862-890, June.
    2. Kee Chung & Jangkoo Kang & Joon-Seok Kim, 2011. "Tick size, market structure, and market quality," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 57-81, January.
    3. Assaf, Ata, 2006. "The stochastic volatility in mean model and automation: Evidence from TSE," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 241-253, May.
    4. Vuorenmaa, Tommi A., 2008. "Decimalization, Realized Volatility, and Market Microstructure Noise," MPRA Paper 8692, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Saraoglu, Hakan & Louton, David & Holowczak, Richard, 2014. "Institutional impact and quote behavior implications of the options penny pilot project," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 54(4), pages 473-486.
    6. Bacidore, Jeffrey & Battalio, Robert H. & Jennings, Robert H., 2003. "Order submission strategies, liquidity supply, and trading in pennies on the New York Stock Exchange," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 337-362, May.
    7. Alexander, Gordon J. & Peterson, Mark A., 2002. "Implications of a Reduction in Tick Size on Short-Sell Order Execution," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 37-60, January.
    8. MacKinnon, Greg & Nemiroff, Howard, 2004. "Tick size and the returns to providing liquidity," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 57-73.
    9. Griffiths, Mark D. & Smith, Brian F. & Turnbull, D. Alasdair S. & White, Robert W., 1998. "Information flows and open outcry: evidence of imitation trading," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 101-116, June.
    10. Chung, Kee H. & Chuwonganant, Chairat & McCormick, D. Timothy, 2004. "Order preferencing and market quality on NASDAQ before and after decimalization," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(3), pages 581-612, March.
    11. Peterson, Mark & Sirri, Erik, 2003. "Evaluation of the biases in execution cost estimation using trade and quote data," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 259-280, May.
    12. Irwan Adi Ekaputra & Erni Sukmadini Asikin, 2012. "Impact of Tick Size Reduction on Small Caps Price Efficiency and Execution cost on the Indonesia Stock Exchange," Asian Academy of Management Journal of Accounting and Finance (AAMJAF), Penerbit Universiti Sains Malaysia, vol. 8(Supp. 1), pages 1-12.
    13. Sangram Keshari Jena & Ashutosh Dash, 2015. "Is call auction efficient for better price discovery?," Asian Journal of Empirical Research, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 5(8), pages 102-113, August.
    14. Bacidore, Jeffrey M. & Battalio, Robert H. & Jennings, Robert H., 2002. "Depth improvement and adjusted price improvement on the New York stock exchange," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 5(2), pages 169-195, April.
    15. Ke, Mei-Chu & Jiang, Ching-Hai & Huang, Yen-Sheng, 2004. "The impact of tick size on intraday stock price behavior: evidence from the Taiwan Stock Exchange," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 19-39, January.
    16. Michał Zator, 2014. "Transaction costs and volatility on Warsaw Stock Exchange: implications for financial transaction tax," Bank i Kredyt, Narodowy Bank Polski, vol. 45(4), pages 349-372.
    17. Murphy Jun Jie Lee, 2013. "The Microstructure of Trading Processes on the Singapore Exchange," PhD Thesis, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney, number 4.
    18. David Abad & Mikel Tapia, 2003. "Impacto Sobre El Mercado Bursatil Español De Los Cambios En Las Variaciones Mínimas De Precios Tras La Introducción Del Euro," Working Papers. Serie EC 2003-17, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    19. Eom, Kyong Shik & Ok, Jinho & Park, Jong-Ho, 2007. "Pre-trade transparency and market quality," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 319-341, November.
    20. Battalio, Robert & Holden, Craig W., 2001. "A simple model of payment for order flow, internalization, and total trading cost," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 33-71, January.
    21. Bacidore, Jeffrey M., 2001. "Decimalization, adverse selection, and market maker rents," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 829-855, May.

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