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Housing outcomes: an assessment of long-term trends

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  • James A. Orr
  • Richard Peach

Abstract

This paper was presented at the conference \\"Unequal incomes, unequal outcomes? Economic inequality and measures of well-being\\" as part of session 2, \\" Affordability of housing for young and poor families.\\" The conference was held at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York on May 7, 1999. The authors examine trends in housing outcomes by income group. Orr and Peach indicate that there has been a substantial improvement in the physical adequacy of the housing stock over the past few decades, particularly for households in the lowest income quintile. Neighborhood quality for all income groups has also improved, although sharp differences in quality continue to exist across the groups. In one important respect, however, lower income households are worse off than before - housing costs now absorb a larger share of their income.

Suggested Citation

  • James A. Orr & Richard Peach, 1999. "Housing outcomes: an assessment of long-term trends," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 5(Sep), pages 51-61.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednep:y:1999:i:sep:p:51-61:n:v.5no.3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Samuel H. Preston & Michael R. Haines, 1991. "References," NBER Chapters, in: Fatal Years: Child Mortality in Late Nineteenth-Century America, pages 237-258, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Charles T. Clotfelter & Ronald G. Ehrenberg & Malcolm Getz & John J. Siegfried, 1991. "References," NBER Chapters, in: Economic Challenges in Higher Education, pages 393-410, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Barbara A. Wiens‐Tuers, 2004. "There's No Place Like Home," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(4), pages 881-896, October.
    2. Ron J. Feldman, 2002. "The affordable housing shortage: considering the problem, causes and solutions," Banking and Policy Studies 2-02, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.

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    Keywords

    Housing; Housing - Finance;

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