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Flowing into Employment: Implications for the Participation Rate


  • Mustre-del-Rio, Jose

    () (Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City)

  • Redmond, Michael

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City)

  • Xu, William

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City)


José Mustre-del-Río, Michael Redmond, and William Xu find more prime-age individuals are flowing into employment from outside the labor force, though effects on the participation rate could be limited by educational attainment.

Suggested Citation

  • Mustre-del-Rio, Jose & Redmond, Michael & Xu, William, 2016. "Flowing into Employment: Implications for the Participation Rate," Macro Bulletin, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 1-3, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedkmb:00040

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Yongsung Chang & Sun-Bin Kim & Mark Bils, 2013. "How Sticky Wages in Existing Jobs can affect Hiring," 2013 Meeting Papers 1162, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Pablo A. Guerron-Quintana & Ryo Jinnai, "undated". "Liquidity, Trends and the Great Recession," Working Papers e66, Tokyo Center for Economic Research.
    3. Barry Eichengreen & Donghyun Park & Kwanho Shin, 2017. "The Global Productivity Slump: Common and Country-Specific Factors," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 16(3), pages 1-41, Fall.
    4. Jeff E. Biddle, 2014. "Retrospectives: The Cyclical Behavior of Labor Productivity and the Emergence of the Labor Hoarding Concept," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 28(2), pages 197-212, Spring.
    5. Laurence Ball, 2014. "Long-term damage from the Great Recession in OECD countries," European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies: Intervention, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 11(2), pages 149-160, September.
    6. John Haltiwanger & Ron S. Jarmin & Javier Miranda, 2013. "Who Creates Jobs? Small versus Large versus Young," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(2), pages 347-361, May.
    7. Diego Anzoategui & Diego Comin & Mark Gertler & Joseba Martinez, 2016. "Endogenous Technology Adoption and R&D as Sources of Business Cycle Persistence," NBER Working Papers 22005, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    More about this item


    Labor Market; Employment; Participation Rate;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity


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