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Long-term survey-based inflation expectations have become better anchored


  • Hakkio, Craig S.

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City)


Craig S. Hakkio finds that while the median of some long-term inflation forecasts has declined, the distribution of individual forecasts suggests long-term inflation expectations have in fact become better anchored.

Suggested Citation

  • Hakkio, Craig S., 2015. "Long-term survey-based inflation expectations have become better anchored," Macro Bulletin, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 1-3, Oct 6.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedkmb:00033

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Eyal Dvir & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2009. "Three Epochs of Oil," NBER Working Papers 14927, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Bassam Fattouh, Lutz Kilian, and Lavan Mahadeva, 2013. "The Role of Speculation in Oil Markets: What Have We Learned So Far?," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3).
    3. Christiane Baumeister & Lutz Kilian, 2016. "Understanding the Decline in the Price of Oil since June 2014," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 131-158.
    4. Apostolos Serletis, 2012. "Oil Price Uncertainty," World Scientific Books, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., number 8407, January.
    5. Akram, Q. Farooq, 2009. "Commodity prices, interest rates and the dollar," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 838-851, November.
    6. Lutz Kilian, 2009. "Not All Oil Price Shocks Are Alike: Disentangling Demand and Supply Shocks in the Crude Oil Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(3), pages 1053-1069, June.
    7. Ratti, Ronald A & Vespignani, Joaquin L., 2012. "Why are crude oil prices high when global activity is weak?," MPRA Paper 43777, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Kesicki, Fabian, 2010. "The third oil price surge - What's different this time?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 1596-1606, March.
    9. Ratti, Ronald A. & Vespignani, Joaquin L., 2013. "Why are crude oil prices high when global activity is weak?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(1), pages 133-136.
    10. Badel, Alejandro & McGillicuddy, Joseph, 2015. "Oil Prices: Is Supply or Demand Behind the Slump?," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue 8.
    11. Samya Beidas-Strom & Andrea Pescatori, 2014. "Oil Price Volatility and the Role of Speculation," IMF Working Papers 14/218, International Monetary Fund.
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