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Contracting costs, inflation, and relative price variability

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  • Patricia Reagan
  • Rene M. Stulz

Abstract

This paper provides an analysis of the effect of relative price uncertainty and price level uncertainty on contracting costs. The paper shows that, as relative price uncertainty or price level uncertainty increase, contracts where performance is assured through the posting of a bond become more advantageous than contracts that rely on reputation. Increases in relative price and price level uncertainty make contracting more expensive by increasing the payoff from defaulting on long-term contracts when unfavorable realizations occur. As uncertainty increases, long-term contracting becomes less frequent and reputation plays a smaller role in contracting. Copyright 1993 by Ohio State University Press.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Patricia Reagan & Rene M. Stulz, 1993. "Contracting costs, inflation, and relative price variability," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 585-611.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedcpr:y:1993:p:585-611
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    Cited by:

    1. Mariano Tommasi, 1996. "High inflation: resource misallocations and growth effects," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 23(2 Year 19), pages 157-177, December.
    2. William Seyfried & Bradley Ewing, 2004. "A time-varying volatility approach to modeling the phillips curve: A cross-country analysis," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 28(2), pages 186-197, June.
    3. Christoph S. Weber, 2017. "The Unemployment Effect of Central Bank Transparency," Working Papers 172, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).
    4. Wang, Yizhong & Chen, Carl R. & Chen, Lifang & Huang, Ying Sophie, 2016. "Overinvestment, inflation uncertainty, and managerial overconfidence: Firm level analysis of Chinese corporations," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 54-69.
    5. Lim, Terence & Lo, Andrew W. & Merton, Robert C. & Scholes, Myron S., 2006. "The Derivatives Sourcebook," Foundations and Trends(R) in Finance, now publishers, vol. 1(5–6), pages 365-572, April.
    6. Stanley Fischer, 1995. "Modern Approaches to Central Banking," NBER Working Papers 5064, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Ewing, Bradley T. & Seyfried, William L, 2003. "Modeling The Philips Curve: A Time-Varying Volatility Approach," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 3(2).
    8. Ciżkowicz, Piotr & Rzońca, Andrzej, 2010. "Inflation and corporate investment in selected OECD countries in the years 1960-2005 – an empirical analysis," MPRA Paper 29846, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inflation (Finance) ; Contracts;

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