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Interstate fiscal disparity in 1997


  • Robert Tannenwald


Readily available tax statistics tell state and local policymakers the amount and mix of revenues that their governments receive. However, these officials pose harder fiscal questions than simply how much money is flowing into their coffers and from what sources. They frequently ask, What is our state's capacity to raise revenues, regardless of how much we actually collect? To what extent do we utilize that capacity? Is our revenue capacity sufficient to finance our state's need for public services? These questions are especially salient today, given that during state fiscal year 2002 (FY2002) revenues in most states fell far short of their targeted levels. ; Questions surrounding the issue of fiscal adequacy are difficult to answer definitively. In previous articles appearing in this Review (Tannenwald 1998, 1999), we evaluated interstate differences in fiscal capacity and fiscal need for FY1994 and FY1996. Prior to these efforts, the U.S. Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations (ACIR) developed indicators providing such interstate comparisons for several (but not all) years from FY1962 through FY1991. This article presents such comparisons for FY1997.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Tannenwald, 2002. "Interstate fiscal disparity in 1997," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q 3, pages 17-33.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbne:y:2002:i:q3:p:17-33

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Joanna Stavins, 1997. "A comparison of social costs and benefits of paper check presentment and ECP with truncation," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Jul, pages 27-44.
    2. Geoffrey R. Gerdes & Jack K. Walton, 2002. "The use of checks and other noncash payment instruments in the United States," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), issue Aug, pages 360-374.
    3. Jeffrey M. Lacker & John A. Weinberg, 1998. "Can the Fed be a payment system innovator?," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Spr, pages 1-25.
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    Cited by:

    1. Charles Grant & Christos Koulovatianos & Alexander Michaelides & Mario Padula, 2010. "Evidence on the Insurance Effect of Redistributive Taxation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(4), pages 965-973, November.
    2. Charles Grant & Winfried Koeniger, 2009. "Redistributive Taxation and Personal Bankruptcy in U.S. States," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(3), pages 445-467, August.
    3. Grant, Charles & Koulovatianos, Christos & Michaelides, Alexander & Padula, Mario, 2008. "Evidence on the insurance effect of marginal income taxes," CFS Working Paper Series 2008/06, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    4. Masayoshi Hayashi, 2013. "On the Decomposition of Regional Stabilization and Redistribution," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-910, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.

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    Fiscal policy ; Revenue ; State finance;


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