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Building African Scientific Capacity in Food and Agriculture


  • Carl K. Eicher


After 50 years of independence, Africa is still a profoundly agrarian continent where 2/3 of the people directly or indirectly derive their living from agriculture. The central question facing African governments and donor agencies today is “What can be done to transform agriculture in Africa?” The most difficult challenge facing Africa is how to borrow and generate new technology that is supported by an efficient set of core institutions that can increase agricultural productivity and reduce poverty. Building an interactive system of three core institutions – research, education and extension – has been, and will remain, a multigenerational challenge. This paper focuses on building African research capacity and graduate education in Africa in an era of globalization.

Suggested Citation

  • Carl K. Eicher, 2009. "Building African Scientific Capacity in Food and Agriculture," Review of Business and Economic Literature, KU Leuven, Faculty of Economics and Business, Review of Business and Economic Literature, vol. 0(3), pages 238-257.
  • Handle: RePEc:ete:revbec:20090302

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Maros Ivanic & Will Martin, 2008. "Implications of higher global food prices for poverty in low-income countries-super-1," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(s1), pages 405-416, November.
    2. Kherallah, Mylène & Delgado, Christopher L. & Gabre-Madhin, Eleni Z. & Minot, Nicholas & Johnson, Michael, 2002. "Reforming agricultural markets in Africa," Food policy statements 38, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    4. Tom Slayton, 2009. "Rice Crisis Forensics: How Asian Governments Carelessly Set the World Rice Market on Fire," Working Papers 163, Center for Global Development.
    5. David Dawe, 2008. "Can Indonesia Trust The World Rice Market?," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(1), pages 115-132.
    6. Lopez, Ramon & Galinato, Gregmar I., 2007. "Should governments stop subsidies to private goods? Evidence from rural Latin America," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(5-6), pages 1071-1094, June.
    7. Jeffrey A. Frankel, 2008. "The Effect of Monetary Policy on Real Commodity Prices," NBER Chapters,in: Asset Prices and Monetary Policy, pages 291-333 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob & Jayne, Thomas S., 2008. "The Impact of Fertilizer Subsidies on National Fertilizer Use: An Example from Malawi," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6464, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    9. Ivanic, Maros & Martin, Will, 2008. "Implications of higher global food prices for poverty in low-income countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4594, The World Bank.
    10. Mitchell, Donald, 2008. "A note on rising food prices," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4682, The World Bank.
    11. Nora Lustig, 2008. "Thought for Food: The Challenges of Coping with Soaring Food Prices," Working Papers 155, Center for Global Development.
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    More about this item


    Africa; institutions; institution building;

    JEL classification:

    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy


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