IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Peacemaking and peacekeeping: Introduction

Listed author(s):
  • Jurgen Brauer

    ()

    (Augusta State University)

  • J. Paul Dunne

    ()

    (University of the West of England)

This second issue of The EPS Journal takes up the theme of economic aspects of peacemaking and peacekeeping. Economics Nobel-Laureate Lawrence R. Klein reviews the arguments for, and the likely cost of, a standing United Nations peacekeeping force. Lloyd J. Dumas argues that minimizing economic stress points also helps minimize the potential for conflict, and Dietrich Fischer reviews the cost of war as against the cost of war-prevention. But for all the good reasons of why peace is cheaper than war, war nonetheless recurs. Jurgen Brauer examines why there seems to be so little peace - if it is so cheap to obtain - and studies the conditions under which states appear willing to intervene in trouble spots elsewhere. Bassam Yousif, Guy Lamb, J. Paul Dunne, and Ross Fetterly, present a set of country studies - on Iraq, Namibia, Mozambique, Rwanda, and Canada. The Canadian piece is of particular value as there is virtually no literature in existence that tries, as Fetterly does, to compute the cost of providing peacekeeping services. The other country studies offer valuable comparative lessons of what does, and does not, work in post- conflict reconstruction. The final two articles look at the business side of things. Bob French has written a forceful account of what it takes to clean up land mine pollution, and John T. Marlin examines what consumer campaigns might do, and have done, to rattle the market for gold jewelry - and thereby compel gold-mining companies to adopt behaviors that might reduce conflict.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.epsjournal.org.uk/index.php/EPSJ/article/view/34
Download Restriction: Open access 12 months after original publication. Reader registration required.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by Economists for Peace and Security in its journal Economics of Peace and Security Journal.

Volume (Year): 1 (2006)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 1-3

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:epc:journl:v:1:y:2006:i:2:p:1-3
Contact details of provider: Postal:
at the Levy Institute, Box 5000, Annandale-on-Hudson NY 12504, USA

Phone: +1 845-758-0917
Fax: +1 845-758-1149
Web page: http://www.epsjournal.org.uk
Email:


More information through EDIRC

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:epc:journl:v:1:y:2006:i:2:p:1-3. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thea Harvey, Managing Editor, EPSJ)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.