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Dynamic linkages between Thai and international stock markets


  • Abbas Valadkhani
  • Surachai Chancharat


Purpose - This purpose of this paper is to investigate the existence of cointegration and causality between the stock market price indices of Thailand and its major trading partners (Australia, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, the UK and the USA), using monthly data spanning December 1987 to December 2005. Design/methodology/approach - This paper used both the Engle-Granger two-step procedure (assuming no structural breaks) and the Gregory and Hansen test (allowing for one structural break) provide no evidence of a long-run relationship between the stock prices of Thailand and these countries. Findings - Based on the empirical results obtained from these two residual-based cointegration tests, potential long-run benefits exist from diversifying the investment portfolios internationally to reduce the associated systematic risks across countries. However, in the short-run, three unidirectional Granger causalities run from the stock returns of Hong Kong, the Philippines and the UK to those of Thailand, pair-wise. Furthermore, there are two unidirectional causalities running from the stock returns of Thailand to those of Indonesia and the USA. Empirical evidence was also found of bidirectional Granger causality, suggesting that the stock returns of Thailand and three of its neighbouring countries (Malaysia, Singapore and Taiwan) are interrelated. Originality/value - No previous study examines the possibility that the pair-wise long-run relationship between the stock prices of Thailand and those of both emerging and developed markets may have been subject to a structural break.

Suggested Citation

  • Abbas Valadkhani & Surachai Chancharat, 2008. "Dynamic linkages between Thai and international stock markets," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 35(5), pages 425-441, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:jespps:v:35:y:2008:i:5:p:425-441

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    1. Roberto Dell'Anno & Ferda Halicioglu, 2010. "An ARDL model of unrecorded and recorded economies in Turkey," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(6), pages 627-646, November.
    2. HUSSAIN Haroon & HUSSAIN Rana Yasir & SHAH Syed Waqar Azeem & FRAZ Ahmed, 2012. "International Portfolio Diversification In Developing Equity Markets Of South Asia," Studies in Business and Economics, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 7(1), pages 80-100, April.
    3. Razmi, Fatemeh & M., Azali & Chin, Lee & Habibullah, Muzafar Shah, 2015. "The effects of oil price and US economy on Thailand's macroeconomy: The role of monetary transmission mechanism," MPRA Paper 69096, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Dimpfl, Thomas, 2014. "A note on cointegration of international stock market indices," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 10-16.
    5. Elie I Bouri, 2013. "Correlation and Volatility of the MENA Equity Markets in Turbulent Periods, and Portfolio Implications," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(2), pages 1575-1593.
    6. Dr. Ranjan Dasgupta, 2014. "Integration and Dynamic Linkages of the Indian Stock Market with Bric - An Empirical Study," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 4(6), pages 715-731, June.
    7. Naseri, Marjan & Masih, Mansur, 2014. "Integration and Comovement of Developed and Emerging Islamic Stock Markets: A Case Study of Malaysia," MPRA Paper 58799, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Anil Sharma & Neha Seth, 2012. "Literature review of stock market integration: a global perspective," Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 4(1), pages 84-122, April.
    9. Amanjot SINGH & Parneet KAUR, 2015. "Stock Market Linkages: Evidence From the US, China and India During the Subprime Crisis," Timisoara Journal of Economics and Business, West University of Timisoara, Romania, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, vol. 8(1), pages 137-162, June.
    10. Eli Bouri & Andre Eid & Imad Kachacha, 2014. "The Dynamic Behaviour and Determinants of Linkages among Middle Eastern and North African Stock Exchanges," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 19(1), pages 1-22, March.
    11. Kasilingam Lingaraja & Murugesan Selvam & Vinayagamoorthi Vasanth & Ramachandran Rajesh Ramkumar, 2015. "Long-run Overseas Portfolio Diversification Benefits and Opportunities of Asian Emerging Stock Markets and Developed Markets," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 5(2), pages 324-333.
    12. Yang, Lixiong & Lee, Chingnun & Shie, Fu Shuen, 2014. "How close a relationship does a capital market have with other markets? A reexamination based on the equal variance test," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 198-226.
    13. Syed Muhammad Aamir Shah & Muhammad Husnain & Ashraf Ali, 2012. "Is Pakistani Equity Market Integrated to the Equity Markets of Group of Eight (G8) Countries? An Empirical Analysis of Karachi Stock Exchange," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 15(45), pages 289-324, September.


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