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Poverty and vulnerability in urban Bangladesh: the case of slum communities in Dhaka City


  • Shahadat Hossain


Purpose - This paper aims to explore the poverty and vulnerability of poor urban communities living in Dhaka City's slums. Design/methodology/approach - Poverty line definition often conceptualises poverty in terms of income, consumption and household resources which has been used for this study. Data have been collected from 500 respondents living in slums in three neighbourhoods of Dhaka City by using a structured questionnaire. In addition, qualitative data have been used to supplement the survey data. Both descriptive and inferential statistics are used for analysing data. Findings - The paper argues that slum communities experience poverty and vulnerability in terms of income, consumption and asset which is most strongly influenced by location, pattern of habitat, gender, recent migration and household organisation. Originality/value - The paper offers insights into poverty and vulnerability in urban Bangladesh.

Suggested Citation

  • Shahadat Hossain, 2007. "Poverty and vulnerability in urban Bangladesh: the case of slum communities in Dhaka City," International Journal of Development Issues, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 6(1), pages 50-62, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:ijdipp:v:6:y:2007:i:1:p:50-62

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Heller, Lauren R., 2013. "Do slums matter? Location and early childhood preventive care choices among urban residents of Bangladesh," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 43-55.

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    Poverty; Urban communities; Bangladesh;


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