IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

The food business environment and the role of China and Brazil building a “food bridge”


  • Marcos Fava Neves


Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to discuss the economic crisis of 2008/2009 and the major impacts on developing nations and food-producing countries. Within this macro-environment of food chains, there is concern that food inflation might come back sooner than expected. The role of China as one of the major food consumers in the future, and Brazil, as the major food producer, is described as the food bridge, and an agenda of common development of these countries suggested. Design/methodology/approach - This paper reviews literature on causes of food inflation, production shortages, and investigation of programs to solve the problem in the future, it is also based on author's personal insights and experience of working on this field in the last 15 years, and recent discussions in forums and interviews. Findings - The major factors that jointly caused food prices increase in 2007/2008 were population growth, income distribution, urbanization, dollar devaluations, commodity funds, social programs, production shortages, and biofuels. A list of ten policies is suggested: horizontal expansion of food production, vertical expansion, reduction in transaction costs, in protectionism and other taxes, investment in logistics, technology and better coordination, contracts, new generation of fertilizers and to use the best sources of biofuels. Originality/value - Two major outputs from this paper are the “food demand model” that inserts in one model the trends and causes of food inflation and the solutions; and the “food bridge concept” that also aligns in one box the imminent major food chain cooperation between China and Brazil.

Suggested Citation

  • Marcos Fava Neves, 2010. "The food business environment and the role of China and Brazil building a “food bridge”," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 2(1), pages 25-35, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:caerpp:v:2:y:2010:i:1:p:25-35

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Veeck, Ann & Veeck, Gregory, 2000. "Consumer Segmentation and Changing Food Purchase Patterns in Nanjing, PRC," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 457-471, March.
    2. Hengyun Ma & Jikun Huang & Frank Fuller & Scott Rozelle, 2006. "Getting Rich and Eating Out: Consumption of Food Away from Home in Urban China," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 54(1), pages 101-119, March.
    3. Ana M. Angulo & José M. Gil & Jesús Mur, 2007. "Spanish Demand for Food Away from Home: Analysis of Panel Data," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 289-307, June.
    4. Bruce Pietrykowski, 2004. "You Are What You Eat: The Social Economy of the Slow Food Movement," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 62(3), pages 307-321.
    5. Fred J. Prochaska & R. A. Schrimper, 1973. "Opportunity Cost of Time and Other Socioeconomic Effects on Away-From-Home Food Consumption," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 55(4_Part_1), pages 595-603.
    6. Stewart, Hayden & Yen, Steven T., 2004. "Changing household characteristics and the away-from-home food market: a censored equation system approach," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 643-658, December.
    7. Vicki A. McCracken & Jon A. Brandt, 1987. "Household Consumption of Food-Away-From-Home: Total Expenditure and by Type of Food Facility," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 69(2), pages 274-284.
    8. Mancino, Lisa & Newman, Constance, 2007. "Who Has Time To Cook? How Family Resources Influence Food Preparation," Economic Research Report 55961, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    9. Schluep Campo, Isabelle & Beghin, John C., 2006. "Dairy food consumption, supply, and policy in Japan," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 228-237, June.
    10. Martinez, Stephen W. & Stewart, Hayden, 2003. "From Supply Push to Demand Pull: Agribusiness Strategies for Today's Consumers," Amber Waves, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, November.
    11. Stewart, Hayden & Blisard, Noel & Jolliffe, Dean & Bhuyan, Sanjib, 2005. "The Demand for Food Away from Home: Do Other Preferences Compete with Our Desire to Eat Healthfully?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 30(03), December.
    12. Schroeter, Christiane & Lusk, Jayson L., 2008. "Economic Factors and Body Weight: An Empirical Analysis," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 40(02), pages 523-538, August.
    13. Maria Sagrario Floro & Marjorie Miles, 2003. "Time use, work and overlapping activities: evidence from Australia," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(6), pages 881-904, November.
    14. Angulo, Ana Maria & Gil, Jose Maria & Mur, Jesus, 2002. "Spanish Demand for Food Away From Home: A Panel Data Approach," 2002 International Congress, August 28-31, 2002, Zaragoza, Spain 24977, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    15. Curtis, Kynda R. & McCluskey, Jill J. & Wahl, Thomas I., 2007. "Consumer preferences for western-style convenience foods in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 1-14.
    16. Lin, Biing-Hwan & Frazao, Elizabeth, 1997. "Nutritional Quality of Foods At and Away From Home," Food Review: The Magazine of Food Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, vol. 20(2).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eme:caerpp:v:2:y:2010:i:1:p:25-35. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Virginia Chapman). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.