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Sector cultural y creativo y riqueza de las regiones: en busca de causalidades


  • Pau Rausell-Köster

    (Instituto interuniversitario de desarrollo local (IIDL) y Universitat de València)

  • Francisco Marco-Serrano

    ((K|P|K – Key Productivity Konsulting) y Universitat Jaume I)

  • Raúl Abeledo Sanchís

    (Universitat de València)


The ‘cultural and creative industries’ concept is a new but relevant one. Several previous works have tried to link a more intense presence of these with the regions welfare. However, there is no conclusive one in the literature. In this article, we build a theoretical framework to interpret the causality between richness and employed in cultural sectors, then, using regional data for Spain between the years 2000 and 2008, we focus in testing the relationship between GDPpc and the employment in the ‘cultural and creative industries’ in order to assess if any kind of causality actually exists. Our results seem promising, having found there is a significant feedback (bi-directional causality) between the variation in the GDPpc and the variation in the employment intensity in the ‘creative industries’. These findings, together with other parallel results, reveal a significant effect on the scope and functionality of cultural policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Pau Rausell-Köster & Francisco Marco-Serrano & Raúl Abeledo Sanchís, 2011. "Sector cultural y creativo y riqueza de las regiones: en busca de causalidades," EKONOMIAZ. Revista vasca de Economía, Gobierno Vasco / Eusko Jaurlaritza / Basque Government, vol. 78(03), pages 66-89.
  • Handle: RePEc:ekz:ekonoz:2011306

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Margit Mayer, 2006. "Manuel Castells'"The City and the Grassroots"," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(1), pages 202-206, March.
    2. Jason Potts & Stuart Cunningham & John Hartley & Paul Ormerod, 2008. "Social network markets: a new definition of the creative industries," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 32(3), pages 167-185, September.
    3. L. Randall Wray & Stephanie Bell, 2004. "Introduction," Chapters,in: Credit and State Theories of Money, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Editor, 2009. "Contents," The Journal of Comparative Economic Studies (JCES), The Japanese Society for Comparative Economic Studies (JSCES), vol. 5, pages 0, December.
    5. Philippe Robert-Demontrond & R. Ringoot, 2004. "Introduction," Post-Print halshs-00081823, HAL.
    6. Tyler Cowen, 2000. "Creative industries: contracts between art and commerce, by Caves, R.E. Cambridge and London: Harvard University Press, 2000, ix + 454 pp., $45.00 (cloth)," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(5), pages 208-209.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rafael Boix & José Luis Hervás-Oliver & Blanca De Miguel-Molina, 2013. "“I want creative neighbours”. Do creative service industries spillovers cross regional boundaries?," Working Papers 1315, Department of Applied Economics II, Universidad de Valencia.
    2. Jenny Cardenas-Ayala & Leandro Valiati, 2014. "Cultural and Creative Industries as Determining Qualified International Flow Trade in Latin America, 2001-2011," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-05-2014, Association for Cultural Economics International, revised Oct 2014.

    More about this item


    cultural employment; economic development; richness; causality;

    JEL classification:

    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • C40 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - General


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