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Productivity Performance and Export Performance: A Time-Series Perspective


  • Abdulnasser Hatemi-J

    (University of Skovde)

  • Manuchehr Irandoust

    () (University of Orebro)


Recent trade theory suggests that the relationship between trade and productivity is fundamentally ambiguous. This study investigates the cointegration and causal relationship between productivity growth and export growth for a number of industrialized countries. On the basis of Johansen's technique and the augmented Granger causality tests, the evidence shows that productivity and exports are causally related in the long run for each economy. The results suggest that export growth contributes to productivity growth and, thus, the expansion of exports is an integral part of productivity growth. We interpret these results as strongly supportive of the role of endogenous growth models in explaining continuous growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Abdulnasser Hatemi-J & Manuchehr Irandoust, 2001. "Productivity Performance and Export Performance: A Time-Series Perspective," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 27(2), pages 149-164, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:eej:eeconj:v:27:y:2001:i:2:p:149-164

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Blog mentions

    As found by, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Produttività e export
      by Alberto Bagnai in Goofynomics on 2014-08-17 22:54:00


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    Cited by:

    1. Lee, Jooh & Habte-Giorgis, Berhe, 2004. "Empirical approach to the sequential relationships between firm strategy, export activity, and performance in U.S. manufacturing firms," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 101-129, February.
    2. repec:spr:jsecdv:v:19:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s40847-017-0037-z is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Sarmidi, Tamat & Salleh, Norlida H, 2010. "Dynamic inter-relationship between trade, economic growth and tourism in Malaysia," MPRA Paper 21056, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Mustafa Akal, 2006. "Causalities Among Growth Related Policy Variables In Turkey, 1950-2004," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 6(3).
    5. Annamaria Kazai Onodi & Krisztina Pecze, 2014. "Behind the Exporters’ Success: Analysis of Successful Hungarian Exporter Companies From a Strategic Perspective," Managing Global Transitions, University of Primorska, Faculty of Management Koper, vol. 12(4 (Winter), pages 325-346.

    More about this item


    Exports; Growth; Productivity; Trade;

    JEL classification:

    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade


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